last movie you watched

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MikeFromHolland
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Re: last movie you watched

Post by MikeFromHolland »

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Received and watched one of the three new Anti-Worlds releases, just because I enjoyed the very unusual films from the first batch so much. This one is also very enjoyable when you’re open to experimental movies.

Krabi 2562 takes you on a journey through this place in Thailand at the hand of some people who come and go. We get to meet some citizens, a film crew, a mysterious woman who disappears and even watch scenes of prehistoric cave people to get a sense of how long people are living in Krabi already.

Scenes, sounds and photography is beautiful and the pace is slow. One to watch again and again...

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Re: last movie you watched

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I watched Bloodshot this afternoon, a vehicle for Vin Diesel that probably had intentions of spawning a sequel, although unfortunate timing with Covid-19 occurring hampered its box office prospects somewhat. But Sony were quick to make it available through streaming platforms.

Directed by Dave Wilson, whose career thus far has been in visual effects, both in cinema and the gaming industry, this is a film that's lacking not only originality, but a better sense of fun and excitement as a stone-faced and expressionless Diesel takes the role of a cyborg/super soldier, the likes of which we've seen before in Cyborg, Soldier, Robocop, etc. Even Captain America’s Winter Soldier.

We first encounter his character on an army mission, which is a success, but when vacationing with his wife, they're kidnapped by arms dealers and murdered. But he'll be back. And back he comes. Remade. Remembering his past. And seeking revenge. But this isn't what his programmer, played by Guy Pierce, in a familiar role with a ropey accent, wants.

He's rebuilt quicker than it takes to download a film, and when introduced to other former soldiers who have suffered a similar fate, it initially seems as though the film is going to take a cyborg-Dirty Dozen route. Although, curiously, the lab and compound where they are built, live, and train, is about as sparsely populated as any mainstream film of this type that I can think of.

The story does take another turn, which I won't elaborate on for the sake of spoilers, but even this feels shopworn and derivative, although it momentarily injects some life into an incredibly banal film. Which occasionally has some visual flair, but it's more visually ponderous, such a fight in a cloud of flour after a flour truck is used to ram into a convoy. Handy for Vin to walk through in slow motion and with a sense of purpose. Cyborgs don't sweat, I guess.

Pierce is fine in role that's lacking, as is Elza Gonzalez, who plays an unlikely if expected ally. And although it wants to be meta and self-aware, it only falls flat and obvious, such as scene in which Diesel enters a garage full of suped-up cars, only to be encouraged to take the vintage model. Which is a bit like Steve McQueen playing a bad driver in The Hunter. Very underwhelming. But there is another Fast & Furious film coming, which is Vin’s bread and butter, and for how stupid and increasingly indulgent those films are, they are daft and have been more fun as the series has progressed. To a point at least.
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Re: last movie you watched

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Nice site for watching a big amount of shorts made throughout the world:

https://www.viddsee.com/

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Re: last movie you watched

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I watched Just Mercy tonight, which is based on true events surrounding the death row appeal to have the murder conviction against Walter McMillan - played by Jamie Foxx - quashed in the late-eighties and early-nineties. Written and directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, who done such accomplished work with Short Term 12, here, he's less even-handed but is reunited with Brie Larson who plays a member of the legal team fighting to free McMillan, who is facing death despite flawed evidence and false testimony.

Michael B. Jordan takes the central role as Bryan Stevenson, a young lawyer who moves to Alabama where he wants to make a difference to those who believe they are facing the inevitable on death row, this, in the same part of the country Harper Lee set To Kill a Mockingbird. As he's frequently reminded. The pride in this great novel (and film) ironically contracting the systemic and institutional racism that he comes to experience first hand.

The acting is splendid all round here, with Cretton focusing purely and squarely on Stevenson’s side, giving little time mulling over who the real culprit was or trying to explain what's wrong with the legal system or within aspects of society, including the police. We see this through the experience of these characters, both outside and inside prison.

Inside, there's a warm camaraderie between Foxx’s McMillan and two other death row inmates, and when the time comes for an execution, this is handled with all of the tact and grace that permeates throughout this film. It's subtle, with no interest in shock value, and no need to play overwrought in the courtroom scenes, where hand-wringing, desk-thumping speeches are often de rigueur in films of this type. Even the best of them. But not here.

Here, the dignity of these characters shines through, even in dark and unsettling moments. With Larson splendid in a small role, Jordan a triumph of understatement, and the marvellous Jamie Foxx finding truth and genuine depth in a character that is graced with the best of his abilities. This is a powerful, moving, very impressive film in so many ways, which stays true to the facts, even if and when a few expected beats occur. Recommended.
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Re: last movie you watched

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Next for me tonight was the Child's Play reboot from last year, which takes a different approach to the original series, with the first Child's Play being a bona fide slasher film with an air of pastiche about it. Here, it's more satirical, with the new Buddi dolls being an Ai companion that learns from its user, and has in interface that accepts commands of all types, much like many interactive devices.

Made in a Far Eastern sweat shop, one particular model is allowed onto the market after a disgruntled and suicidal employee removes all inhibitors and shuts off the factory settings. Somewhere along the way, it gains a mind of its own, and when this model is returned to a department store in the U.S., working mother, Aubrey Plaza, talks her boss into letting here keep it for her son, Andy.

Voiced by Mark Hamill, the doll soon calls itself Chucky and grows protective of his new best friend, who is a lonely boy, with no friends in a new neighbourhood and feeling distant from his mother, who is always in the hands of her new boyfriend.

Hamill plays Chucky with wide-eyed nativity to him, which is reflected in the expressions of this bizarre looking doll, which looks wholly forlorn after being chastised for strangling Andy's cat when it scratches him.

He observes, seeing what Andy likes and dislikes, and wants to copy because they're friends -- Andy, incidentally, loves Texas Chainsaw Massacre II. It's well paced and I really liked the score, which plays like a broken down nursery tune on a wind-up music box, whilst the opening advertisement for the new line of toys reminded me of the news broadcasts in Robocop.

There's also a range of Buddi dolls, and costumes, one being, quite amusingly, a leprechaun costume, whilst the Buddi Bear is akin to one of the creatures from Island of Lost Souls. It does run out of ideas in the final act, but I enjoyed this reboot and appreciated how it took a new slant on a familiar character and story. It's hardly special, but it's fun. And funny. With some slasher film charm as garden tools, bench saws, etc., come into play as the bodies mount up. And Mark Hamill singing the theme song is a nice touch.
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Re: last movie you watched

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I started watching The Haunting of Bly Manor this evening and, two episodes in, it's pretty much the disappointment I was expecting. They have taken Henry James's The Turn of the Screw (which is only about 100 pages) and turned it into a nine-hour epic. Sadly, they seem to have not understood just what makes the novella so unnerving - that we DON'T know things. We don't know what Miles had done at school to have him expelled. And we don't know virtually anything about the relationship between Quint and Miss Jessel. But here we are painstakingly taken through why Miles got expelled, and episode 3 (which I have yet to sleep through) seems to be one in which we get a flashback to Quint and Jessel.

Ironically, there are references to the 1961 film of the same novel, The Innocents, which is superior in every way (but then it might well be superior to ANY traditional ghost story film). The same folk song/nursery rhyme is used as in the TV series as in the film, and the governness is given the surname of Clayton - a reference to Jack Clayton, who directed the film. There are also references to other Henry James ghost stories - the family name of the uncle who owns Bly is Wingrave, and the cook's name is Owen (Owen Wingrave is another Henry James ghost story). Things are not helped by Bly being occupied not just by the governness, Mrs Grose and the kids, but also a cook and a gardener. The imposing, dark house of the text is now a place where everyone has a nice chit-chat and a laugh over breakfast.

The dialogue also leaves something to be desired. It might be set in England in 1987, but presumably the writers have never been to England or spoken to English people, and neither do they have much idea about English country life 35 years ago. School teachers did not talk about kids using the classroom as a "safe space" to air their problems. The term wasn't even being used at that point - certainly not in the UK. And a British child in 1987 would not call the entrance hall to a house a "foyer." I doubt many would even do that in 2020. In fact, the 1987 setting is so poorly rendered, that you keep wondering when a mobile phone is going to appear.

It IS perfectly watchable, I'm not denying that, but it needs to be much better than that when there are already screen adaptations from 1955, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1965, 1971 (sort of), 1974, 1982, 1985, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2009 (twice), 2012, 2013, 2015, 2019, and 2020. I might have missed some.

So, I would recommend using your time better and finding a copy of The Innocents instead - it's genuinely unnerving, and it takes only two hours to watch instead of the nine hours of The Haunting of Bly Manor. You could use the other seven hours to watch the best of some of the other adaptations, such as the Spanish version from 1985 directed by Eloy de la Iglesia, entitled Otra vuelta de tuerca. It was so critically mauled at the time of release that de la Iglesia didn't make another movie for eighteen years. It was our loss, and his version of Turn of the Screw is genuinely unsettling and disturbing, and ripe for the re-evaluation that it deserves.

Also worthwhile is the 1959 TV version directed by John Frankenheimer and starring Ingrid Bergman. Like The Innocents, it's based on the hit stage play of the novel , which had starred Flora Robson with Jeremy Spenser, who must have been the most perfect Miles imaginable. The Bergman version is available to view on Internet Archive.

Also of note is the blu ray of the Glyndebourne opera version of the Britten opera. The structure of the Britten opera also seems to have influenced the 1961 film. One of the great things about the Britten opera is that it remains a rattling good yarn, that is remarkably creepy. Glyndebourne exploit the psycho-sexual undercurrents of the story to great effect, and the bathroom scene just before the end of act one is both riveting and deeply uncomfortable to watch. On stage, it was one of the best opera productions I've seen, and much of that magic remains on the DVD/blu ray. Just for the plain bonkers (and not recommended), there is a 1982 film based on the opera (on YouTube) in which Miles is about sixteen or so and his voice is dubbed by another (clearly younger) singer. The first five minutes of that goes way into Nightcomers territory, and leaves very little to the imagination as to Quint and Jessel's relationship with the kids. Not for the faint-hearted!
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Re: last movie you watched

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I made to the end of episode three of Bly Manor and gave up, as it gets worse rather than better.

And so tonight I turned to the Starzplay series, Pennyworth - which I never got around to before as I didn't have a subscription, but it's currently 99p a month and so signed up so I could watch it. If the first episode is anything to go by, this is going to be quite a blast. Rather the opposite of Bly Manor, it doesn't seem to take itself seriously, and is a great deal of fun.
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Re: last movie you watched

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Greystoke wrote:
Fri Oct 09, 2020 8:52 pm
I watched Bloodshot this afternoon, a vehicle for Vin Diesel that probably had intentions of spawning a sequel, although unfortunate timing with Covid-19 occurring hampered its box office prospects somewhat. But Sony were quick to make it available through streaming platforms.

Directed by Dave Wilson, whose career thus far has been in visual effects, both in cinema and the gaming industry, this is a film that's lacking not only originality, but a better sense of fun and excitement as a stone-faced and expressionless Diesel takes the role of a cyborg/super soldier, the likes of which we've seen before in Cyborg, Soldier, Robocop, etc. Even Captain America’s Winter Soldier.

We first encounter his character on an army mission, which is a success, but when vacationing with his wife, they're kidnapped by arms dealers and murdered. But he'll be back. And back he comes. Remade. Remembering his past. And seeking revenge. But this isn't what his programmer, played by Guy Pierce, in a familiar role with a ropey accent, wants.

He's rebuilt quicker than it takes to download a film, and when introduced to other former soldiers who have suffered a similar fate, it initially seems as though the film is going to take a cyborg-Dirty Dozen route. Although, curiously, the lab and compound where they are built, live, and train, is about as sparsely populated as any mainstream film of this type that I can think of.

The story does take another turn, which I won't elaborate on for the sake of spoilers, but even this feels shopworn and derivative, although it momentarily injects some life into an incredibly banal film. Which occasionally has some visual flair, but it's more visually ponderous, such a fight in a cloud of flour after a flour truck is used to ram into a convoy. Handy for Vin to walk through in slow motion and with a sense of purpose. Cyborgs don't sweat, I guess.

Pierce is fine in role that's lacking, as is Elza Gonzalez, who plays an unlikely if expected ally. And although it wants to be meta and self-aware, it only falls flat and obvious, such as scene in which Diesel enters a garage full of suped-up cars, only to be encouraged to take the vintage model. Which is a bit like Steve McQueen playing a bad driver in The Hunter. Very underwhelming. But there is another Fast & Furious film coming, which is Vin’s bread and butter, and for how stupid and increasingly indulgent those films are, they are daft and have been more fun as the series has progressed. To a point at least.
We enjoyed Bloodshot,and like you we thouht it was set up to be a franchise,quite an enjoyable vehicle for Vin Diesel.
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Re: last movie you watched

Post by keninlincs »

Over th weekend we wathed The Rock with Nic Cage and Sean Connery,all testesterone and overacting and thoroughly enjoyed it.Also saw The babysitter killer bee the sequel to the 2017 film.Not the best film ever made but an enjoyable way to waste a few hours.Glad we saw it.
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Re: last movie you watched

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Re: last movie you watched

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For those in the Uk, HMV announced three new additions to their Premium Collection range of blu-rays. The remake of The Haunting (heaven knows how this made the cut!), The Two Jakes, and The Sons of Katie Elder.
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Re: last movie you watched

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Rob wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 1:51 pm
I haven’t seen this but it’s amazing that the great Cicely Tyson is still acting at the age of 95.
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Re: last movie you watched

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Had heard a lot about it but hadn't actually watched it yet. Did I enjoy it? Meh. Maybe knowing the closing twist took away some of the punch but I was unable to really get into it. The acting is superb however.

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Re: last movie you watched

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I watched The Trial of the Chicago 7 last night on Netflix, Aaron Sorkin’s second film as a director, after an impressive debut with Molly's Game in 2017. Sorkin also wrote the screenplay, and assembled a strong cast for a project that was originally being developed by Steven Spielberg around a decade ago. And with intentions to cast fewer well-known actors, from what I understand. This being something Spielberg has done with his forthcoming and now delayed version of West Side Story.

Based on the actual events leading up to and during the trial of seven men accused of causing public disorder and riots during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois, Sorkin establishes his narrative through the use of stock footage and newsreels from 1968, showing what was happening socially and politically in America in the weeks and months prior to the convention taking place. Similarly to what Spike Lee done at the start of Da 5 Bloods, in fact.

Sorkin has always brought a great deal of intelligence to his writing, and he does expect viewers to meet him half way in knowing the who and what of the events here, which is mostly fine, because his direction and narrative is straightforward and unfussy. It's also easy to see and appreciate not only narrative and historic parallels with the current political and social climate in North America, this also is stoked in the way Sorkin writes.

There's certainly a good feeling for the period, although events are mostly contained in a courtroom where a show trial is depicted as such, with little consideration for real character depth. Some of the characters, even among the seven, are given little to say or do, and scant backstory into the bargain. Although it's well staged and well-acted, with Eddie Redmayne standing out as Tom Hayden. Playing this character with poise and quiet intelligence, and also the kind of thoughtfulness we often see from Redmayne. He's well cast. As is Joseph Gordon-Levitt as the public prosecutor, Richard Schultz.

Conversely, Sasha Baron Cohen is miscast as Abbie Hoffman, proving unable to find better nuance in a showy performance that's loud and brash, hence his casting. But he chews up almost every scene he's in. Still, the acting is generally good on the whole, including Frank Langella as the incompetent judge who was presiding over this trial.

Unfortunately, Sorkin’s inability to get under the skin of these characters, renders his telling of this story far less involving or moving than it wanted to be. We see the trial. We see the events. But we don't get enough of the people, and that's a critical misstep in a film like this. And this could have been remedied had this been a mini-series instead.

Redmayne is most memorable here, having the best-written character of the seven, and certainly the most three dimensional, even though he still needed more. But it's a good film. An entertaining film and an informative film. Which works in a contained fashion and has more to offer those who can meet it half way. Although it left me wanting.
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Re: last movie you watched

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I started watching Day of the Locust this evening, having recorded it on Talking Pictures. But the picture quality was so grim, it was rather off-putting. Is it worth seeking out elsewhere?
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Re: last movie you watched

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pmp wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 3:29 am
I started watching Day of the Locust this evening, having recorded it on Talking Pictures. But the picture quality was so grim, it was rather off-putting. Is it worth seeking out elsewhere?
That's quite unusual for them, although they did feature some very poor source material when they initially launched, and this was sometimes not from a primary source but a video taped copy, or a copy several generations removed. Which Amazon Prime is guilty of, in fact. But Talking Pictures TV generally has improved. This said, Day of the Locust is worth seeking out. It is quite barbed in places. And the cast is generally good.
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Re: last movie you watched

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I watched The Personal History of David Copperfield last night, which you commented on a few weeks ago, Shane, and I'm certainly in agreement as to how beguiling this film is. Written and directed by Armando Iannucci, whose 2017 film, The Death of Stalin, stood out as an inventive and smart modern take on an historic event. Here, he takes an equally inventive approach to Dickens, giving scant disregard to social conventions and colour, whilst approaching David Copperfield from both inside and out as he weaves a compelling tale with the marvellous Dev Patel in the central role.

Patel, who found his breakthrough in Slumdog Millionaire, has truly found his feet and much success in adulthood as a young actor. He's terrific here, playing Copperfield with all of wit and guile this character needs to come alive. As is the young actor who plays his younger self, as you mentioned in your review, Shane.

Populated by a strong cast, whose performances are broad at times, especially Paul Whitehouse and Tilda Swinton on bonkers form in another role in which she plays her part with the kind of affections, quirks, and traits that Johnny Depp strives for. Here, playing Copperfield’s eccentric aunt, who barges in on the day of his birth, and once again when her young nephew, after coming through trial and tribulation, is once again secure.

Brisk, scenic, and visually inventive, with stellar cinematography from Zac Nicholson, this is a film that leaps from the page and does so in ways that audaciously plays with reality, time, and space. This is marvellous filmmaking. I was very much impressed. Great set design and visual effects, too. And I thought the feeling for the period was true, regardless of visual invention, which allows the viewer to see through Copperfield’s eye, whether wonder and awe, or stark reality draining the colour out of his life.

Last night, and on Friday, I also continued with my horror theme for October, watching Kolchak: The Night Stalker again, which will surely lead me to watching the entire series. I revisited Curse of Chucky, which was, to some extent, a return to form for a series that lost its better roots as a slasher, here, playing on Killer's Kiss, with Chucky taking notes Tommy Udo. Whilst also working on the home invasion conventions that can work so well in horror.

And this can be transferred to a shopping mall, as it was in Chopping Mall, which I also watched again. This sci-fi horror shrugs off any allegory and satire, instead, looking for ample nudity, blood, gore and a rising body count as three mall security robots short circuit and seek to kill the kids who have decided to lock themselves into into the mall. It's good fun, if stilted at times, and poorly acted. There's certainly a hint of Romero here, whilst cautionary tales about technology found a new canvas in horror cinema and sci-fi during the 1980s.

This was also the case in Invitation to Hell, Wes Craven’s 1984 TV movie, which certainly echoes the Stepford Wives via Orpheus, as a young family make the move to a new suburban ideal, where the father, played by Robert Urich, can be closer to a new job. Which involves technology, once again, and a new space suit he's at the forefront of inventing.

Soon, the family is asked to join the country club which is open to employees, but he doesn't want to join, despite his wife wanting to enjoy its exclusivity. Brian Yuzna trod similar ground a few years later with society, at least in a metaphorical sense, but this is a film that, whilst quite taught and well-paced, with some intrigue, ultimately doesn't know how to end. Which is unfortunate. But I enjoyed revisiting this one again, too.

Hell Comes to Frogtown probably seemed like a better idea on paper than it turned out to be in reality, with shades of Mad Max and Planet of the Apes via The Omega Man, only Roddy Piper’s blood isn't the cure. Or the answer to humanity's plight. It's his fertility and his virility. And when he's forcibly recruited by the female-led U.S. military to get into Frogtown, free some captured women, and mate with them, he doesn't bargain on an electrified chastity belt that his commanding officer can set off with her earrings, if he doesn't comply.

Piper never had much range or depth, and who would need it in a film like this, but he surely wanted to find a good follow-up to They Live, and whilst this is woefully cheap and unable to rise above its limitations, he does try and there's some laughs to be found here. Even a brief moment of poignancy. The frog humanoids aren't stellar in their design, but they do look fine, although it's impossible to get invested a film that's so wanting in every way.

Last but not least, Monster (Humanoids from the Deep) was a blast to watch again. This being more an ecological tale, with shades of Jaws and certainly The Creature from the Black Lagoon and The Creature Walks Among us as a primary influences, but there's a slasher mentality to Barbara Peeters’ direction here, too. With Doug McClure, Ann Turkel and Vic Morrow starring, with sub-aquatic humanoids going on the rampage in a small fishing port.
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Re: last movie you watched

Post by keninlincs »

As talked about a few posts back ,we watched Enola Holmes this afternoon on Netflix very enjoyable 2 hours with a fine performance from Millie Bobbie Brown as the titular Enola.Henry Cavill was a wasted part as sherlock,i can feel sequel coming for sure.
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Re: last movie you watched

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Greystoke wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 3:00 pm
I watched The Personal History of David Copperfield last night, which you commented on a few weeks ago, Shane, and I'm certainly in agreement as to how beguiling this film is. Written and directed by Armando Iannucci, whose 2017 film, The Death of Stalin, stood out as an inventive and smart modern take on an historic event. Here, he takes an equally inventive approach to Dickens, giving scant disregard to social conventions and colour, whilst approaching David Copperfield from both inside and out as he weaves a compelling tale with the marvellous Dev Patel in the central role.

Patel, who found his breakthrough in Slumdog Millionaire, has truly found his feet and much success in adulthood as a young actor. He's terrific here, playing Copperfield with all of wit and guile this character needs to come alive. As is the young actor who plays his younger self, as you mentioned in your review, Shane.

Populated by a strong cast, whose performances are broad at times, especially Paul Whitehouse and Tilda Swinton on bonkers form in another role in which she plays her part with the kind of affections, quirks, and traits that Johnny Depp strives for. Here, playing Copperfield’s eccentric aunt, who barges in on the day of his birth, and once again when her young nephew, after coming through trial and tribulation, is once again secure.

Brisk, scenic, and visually inventive, with stellar cinematography from Zac Nicholson, this is a film that leaps from the page and does so in ways that audaciously plays with reality, time, and space. This is marvellous filmmaking. I was very much impressed. Great set design and visual effects, too. And I thought the feeling for the period was true, regardless of visual invention, which allows the viewer to see through Copperfield’s eye, whether wonder and awe, or stark reality draining the colour out of his life.

...
You've been busy! David Copperfield was really great fun, and it's likely to be a title I return to more often than most.

Tonight I watched the 1972 film Child's Play, based upon the stage play of the same name. This was on Talking Pictures, but in the end I hired the HD version from the Sky Store for a few pounds as the quality was decidedly better! I had forgotten just how unsettling a film it is. And, as I said a few days back, it fits very snugly within the mystery thrillers of the period - The Walking Stick; Unwin, Wittering and Zigo; Sleuth; The Last of Sheila etc. It's a rather claustrophobic movie - only leaving the school for a single scene in a hospital ward, and one in James Mason's house. Mason is undoubtedly the one who makes this so worth watching. He was never afraid of being "ugly" on screen. I don't necessarily mean physically (although there's nothing of the matinee idol here), but in that he sometimes took roles where sympathies lie with his character and yet he does ugly things. We see this perhaps most noticeably in A Star is Born, but it's also very much the case here, and again in The Last of Sheila. Robert Preston does seem rather like the wrong actor for the role - but Marlon Brando would have been worse. Perhaps Dirk Bogarde would have got under the skin of this type of character better. But Preston is fine, it's just that he's not what you remember after the movie has finished.

Child's Play is a fine movie, which still has the power to disturb.
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Mister Mike
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Re: last movie you watched

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Flipping through channels, I happened to catch this on one of the movie channels on my cable TV. Quite good. Only discovered it was a Tarantino film at the end (although, throughout the movie, I kept saying to myself the film had a certain 'feel' that I'd seen before.)

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Found this one for free on YouTube. A little bit of escapism on a quiet Sunday afternoon. Lots of big names in a movie that only works if you don't think about it too much :) .

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Re: last movie you watched

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capricorn one is a fun film,one that certainly added to the fake moon landing theory that pops up every now and again.Telly Savalas is very good here ,as is James Brolin.
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Re: last movie you watched

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Mister Mike wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 7:33 am
Flipping through channels, I happened to catch this on one of the movie channels on my cable TV. Quite good. Only discovered it was a Tarantino film at the end (although, throughout the movie, I kept saying to myself the film had a certain 'feel' that I'd seen before.)

Image

Found this one for free on YouTube. A little bit of escapism on a quiet Sunday afternoon. Lots of big names in a movie that only works if you don't think about it too much :) .

Image
Jackie Brown is probably my favourite of Tarantino’s films. It has all of the better qualities his films have come to lack since Kill Bill. Michael Keaton, incidentally, played the same character the following year with a cameo in Steven Soderbergh’s marvellous, Out of Sight. Whilst a great companion piece is Stanley Kubrick’s 1956 heist movie, The Killing.

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Re: last movie you watched

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keninlincs wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:10 am
capricorn one is a fun film,one that certainly added to the fake moon landing theory that pops up every now and again.Telly Savalas is very good here ,as is James Brolin.
You're right. Though he's in the movie for probably less than ten minutes, Savalas is quite good and funny ('Keep your G.D. head down!' :D ). As for Mr. Streisand.... I mean Brolin, he's also quite good and probably shares the lead in the movie with Elliot Gould, though maybe someone might have mentioned that to the person who made up this UK DVD release (Jeez! OJ barely utters more than ten lines in the whole movie):
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Re: last movie you watched

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For fans of Universal Classic Monsters, this incredible deal keeps popping up on Amazon. Unfortunately, it comes and goes.



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Re: last movie you watched

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keninlincs wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:10 am
capricorn one is a fun film,one that certainly added to the fake moon landing theory that pops up every now and again.Telly Savalas is very good here ,as is James Brolin.
But the ending! You gotta imagine that the secret service guys, TV cameras or not, took Brolin out of the game.
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