Elvis Voice change

Anything about Elvis
More than 100 Million visitors can't be wrong

Moderators: Moderator5, Moderator3, FECC-Moderator, Site Mechanic


User avatar

pmp
Posts: 9027
Registered for: 5 years 2 months
Has thanked: 1448 times
Been thanked: 8488 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by pmp »

Igotstung wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 8:17 pm
pmp wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 7:34 pm
Igotstung wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2024 4:02 pm
Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 11:06 pm
Yamaguchi.Y wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 1:19 pm
Interesting points, by everyone.

But, smt179 It's a mystery. 🤔
Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 10:45 am
If it was a cock-up it seems strange they would make the mistake on the Hurt single picture sleeve as well. Like was said, album design takes a while and it doesn’t seem likely that a mistake like that would slip by the RCA art department twice. I think it’s more likely that the album concept just wasn’t fully fleshed out.
Image

Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 11:01 am
It may not have necessarily helped sell any more units but it may have caused more interest in the album if the fact that it was recorded at Graceland had been promoted more. The title alludes to it without any explanation. It could have even been as simple as using the mock up letter by Elvis on the back of the album saying something like: “Dear friends, thank you for your loyalty. I sincerely hope you enjoy my new RCA album that I recorded at my beloved home, Graceland. Best wishes, Elvis Presley

Btw, even at the time in 1976, I thought this mock up letter on the back of the album was strange.
I have seen multiple "originals" of EP-signed letterheads used for the back of the Blvd. album. Multiples. Multiple mock ups that were signed.

smt201
I remember first seeing that picture sleeve and being excited that the new album was going to be a new “live album”.

I didn’t finish my thought about the back mock up letter; I thought it was strange at the time because I thought it was a sort of acknowledgement that he had been struggling for the past year and he was thanking the fans for being loyal to him through that. It also made the album seem more personal than (say) the Today album.

Getting back to the 74 live Memphis album cover. Although I’ve always liked that cover, I think one of the reasons that album didn’t sell as well is because Elvis’ picture was not on the cover. Elvis was the product and the attraction. His picture sold magazines which is why he was constantly on the cover of the movie magazines and the tabloids. So even though it was a rare creative cover from RCA, it still should have been a picture of Elvis on stage (Especially for a live album).
All the albums- live or studio- had the same old picture of jumpsuited Elvis on stage. This was a nice change and might have in fact given an impression that there would be a different set list and some focus on his Memphis roots(I always wondered why there were no tracks from his Memphis specific influences in the concert.)
To be fair, the set list on the original album was quite different to previous live discs:

I Got a Woman
Trying to Get to You
Rock medley
How Great Thou Art
Why Me Lord
Help Me
Lawdy Miss Clawdy
My Baby Left Me
Let Me Be There

That's two-thirds of the material not having been released in a concert setting (or, in some cases) at all. The fast-moving, rock-oriented material was quite different to the ballad heavy Aloha.

It's also worth adding that the 1974 release got excellent reviews from most critics, with some even putting it in the year-end list of best lps. I'm not sure the lack of anniversary link to That's all Right is surprising. Elvis fans are obsessed with anniversaries now, but not so much back then, and the Legendary Performer LP could be said to be marking that anniversary anyway.
My point was the Memphis connection, not anniversary. It was his hometown and he was performing there after 14 years there. It had emotional significance, more than historic.

There was an excellent reason to include not just his own songs recorded at Memphis Recording Service, but also local content which influenced him. What I'll Remember You was for Aloha, but magnified hundred times, because this is a place where he lived as a local legend, where he became a star, where he dreamed and where he got developed as a teen.
It's all very well us saying this fifty years later, but such things probably never crossed his or anyone else's mind at the time. It was just a tour show they happened to tape for a live album. And a damned fine tour show - and a record that gave him his third Grammy and some of the best post-comeback reviews. It just seems that fans are never satisfied and always want something different or something more, no matter how good the actual release was (and Trying to get To You was included).


Accused of being "a nerd in his 20s." I wish.

Image

User avatar

Jaime1234
Posts: 8639
Registered for: 12 years 8 months
Has thanked: 2685 times
Been thanked: 4639 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Jaime1234 »

Well explaned. The skill, the passion and the image.



User avatar

Topic author
Igotstung
Posts: 134
Registered for: 7 months
Has thanked: 126 times
Been thanked: 142 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Igotstung »

pmp wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 2:36 am
Igotstung wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 8:17 pm
pmp wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 7:34 pm
Igotstung wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2024 4:02 pm
Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 11:06 pm
Yamaguchi.Y wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 1:19 pm
Interesting points, by everyone.

But, smt179 It's a mystery. 🤔
Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 10:45 am
If it was a cock-up it seems strange they would make the mistake on the Hurt single picture sleeve as well. Like was said, album design takes a while and it doesn’t seem likely that a mistake like that would slip by the RCA art department twice. I think it’s more likely that the album concept just wasn’t fully fleshed out.
Image

Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 11:01 am
It may not have necessarily helped sell any more units but it may have caused more interest in the album if the fact that it was recorded at Graceland had been promoted more. The title alludes to it without any explanation. It could have even been as simple as using the mock up letter by Elvis on the back of the album saying something like: “Dear friends, thank you for your loyalty. I sincerely hope you enjoy my new RCA album that I recorded at my beloved home, Graceland. Best wishes, Elvis Presley

Btw, even at the time in 1976, I thought this mock up letter on the back of the album was strange.
I have seen multiple "originals" of EP-signed letterheads used for the back of the Blvd. album. Multiples. Multiple mock ups that were signed.

smt201
I remember first seeing that picture sleeve and being excited that the new album was going to be a new “live album”.

I didn’t finish my thought about the back mock up letter; I thought it was strange at the time because I thought it was a sort of acknowledgement that he had been struggling for the past year and he was thanking the fans for being loyal to him through that. It also made the album seem more personal than (say) the Today album.

Getting back to the 74 live Memphis album cover. Although I’ve always liked that cover, I think one of the reasons that album didn’t sell as well is because Elvis’ picture was not on the cover. Elvis was the product and the attraction. His picture sold magazines which is why he was constantly on the cover of the movie magazines and the tabloids. So even though it was a rare creative cover from RCA, it still should have been a picture of Elvis on stage (Especially for a live album).
All the albums- live or studio- had the same old picture of jumpsuited Elvis on stage. This was a nice change and might have in fact given an impression that there would be a different set list and some focus on his Memphis roots(I always wondered why there were no tracks from his Memphis specific influences in the concert.)
To be fair, the set list on the original album was quite different to previous live discs:

I Got a Woman
Trying to Get to You
Rock medley
How Great Thou Art
Why Me Lord
Help Me
Lawdy Miss Clawdy
My Baby Left Me
Let Me Be There

That's two-thirds of the material not having been released in a concert setting (or, in some cases) at all. The fast-moving, rock-oriented material was quite different to the ballad heavy Aloha.

It's also worth adding that the 1974 release got excellent reviews from most critics, with some even putting it in the year-end list of best lps. I'm not sure the lack of anniversary link to That's all Right is surprising. Elvis fans are obsessed with anniversaries now, but not so much back then, and the Legendary Performer LP could be said to be marking that anniversary anyway.
My point was the Memphis connection, not anniversary. It was his hometown and he was performing there after 14 years there. It had emotional significance, more than historic.

There was an excellent reason to include not just his own songs recorded at Memphis Recording Service, but also local content which influenced him. What I'll Remember You was for Aloha, but magnified hundred times, because this is a place where he lived as a local legend, where he became a star, where he dreamed and where he got developed as a teen.
It's all very well us saying this fifty years later, but such things probably never crossed his or anyone else's mind at the time. It was just a tour show they happened to tape for a live album. And a damned fine tour show - and a record that gave him his third Grammy and some of the best post-comeback reviews. It just seems that fans are never satisfied and always want something different or something more, no matter how good the actual release was (and Trying to get To You was included).
It is a message board for a long dead artist. So anything we say is ' all well us saying things ', but the point is that it is being said in good faith as fans of the artist we essentially admire. Wishing for something doesn't automatically equate to diminishing the actual product. Do I like the 1974 album? Resoundingly yes. Do I wish the connection with his hometown which happened to have an tremendous musical history was emphasized? Absolutely yes.



User avatar

ForeverElvis
Posts: 5061
Registered for: 21 years 2 months
Has thanked: 637 times
Been thanked: 2784 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by ForeverElvis »

Igotstung wrote:
pmp wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 7:34 pm
Igotstung wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2024 4:02 pm
Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 11:06 pm
Yamaguchi.Y wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 1:19 pm
Interesting points, by everyone.

But, smt179 It's a mystery. Image
Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 10:45 am
If it was a cock-up it seems strange they would make the mistake on the Hurt single picture sleeve as well. Like was said, album design takes a while and it doesn’t seem likely that a mistake like that would slip by the RCA art department twice. I think it’s more likely that the album concept just wasn’t fully fleshed out.
Image

Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 11:01 am
It may not have necessarily helped sell any more units but it may have caused more interest in the album if the fact that it was recorded at Graceland had been promoted more. The title alludes to it without any explanation. It could have even been as simple as using the mock up letter by Elvis on the back of the album saying something like: “Dear friends, thank you for your loyalty. I sincerely hope you enjoy my new RCA album that I recorded at my beloved home, Graceland. Best wishes, Elvis Presley

Btw, even at the time in 1976, I thought this mock up letter on the back of the album was strange.
I have seen multiple "originals" of EP-signed letterheads used for the back of the Blvd. album. Multiples. Multiple mock ups that were signed.

smt201
I remember first seeing that picture sleeve and being excited that the new album was going to be a new “live album”.

I didn’t finish my thought about the back mock up letter; I thought it was strange at the time because I thought it was a sort of acknowledgement that he had been struggling for the past year and he was thanking the fans for being loyal to him through that. It also made the album seem more personal than (say) the Today album.

Getting back to the 74 live Memphis album cover. Although I’ve always liked that cover, I think one of the reasons that album didn’t sell as well is because Elvis’ picture was not on the cover. Elvis was the product and the attraction. His picture sold magazines which is why he was constantly on the cover of the movie magazines and the tabloids. So even though it was a rare creative cover from RCA, it still should have been a picture of Elvis on stage (Especially for a live album).
All the albums- live or studio- had the same old picture of jumpsuited Elvis on stage. This was a nice change and might have in fact given an impression that there would be a different set list and some focus on his Memphis roots(I always wondered why there were no tracks from his Memphis specific influences in the concert.)
To be fair, the set list on the original album was quite different to previous live discs:

I Got a Woman
Trying to Get to You
Rock medley
How Great Thou Art
Why Me Lord
Help Me
Lawdy Miss Clawdy
My Baby Left Me
Let Me Be There

That's two-thirds of the material not having been released in a concert setting (or, in some cases) at all. The fast-moving, rock-oriented material was quite different to the ballad heavy Aloha.

It's also worth adding that the 1974 release got excellent reviews from most critics, with some even putting it in the year-end list of best lps. I'm not sure the lack of anniversary link to That's all Right is surprising. Elvis fans are obsessed with anniversaries now, but not so much back then, and the Legendary Performer LP could be said to be marking that anniversary anyway.
My point was the Memphis connection, not anniversary. It was his hometown and he was performing there after 14 years there. It had emotional significance, more than historic.

There was an excellent reason to include not just his own songs recorded at Memphis Recording Service, but also local content which influenced him. What I'll Remember You was for Aloha, but magnified hundred times, because this is a place where he lived as a local legend, where he became a star, where he dreamed and where he got developed as a teen.
The connection to Sun or American just wouldn’t have been recognized in the set list just because it was a show in Memphis.

This sort of nostalgic connection to events of the past has become more commonplace the last 30 years or so, maybe the further the events are in the rearview mirror. Or, just better marketing strategists today.

At the time, we didn’t think about anniversaries of such things. Elvis was still a current artist, it was just another album. Elvis himself didn’t spend time recognizing past accomplishments either. A good example of that is the 50’s hits that were run through quickly or in a medley. Elvis would rather be singing Help Me or Let Me Be There rather than Hound Dog or Love Me Tender.


Always Elvis
Anthony

User avatar

Topic author
Igotstung
Posts: 134
Registered for: 7 months
Has thanked: 126 times
Been thanked: 142 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Igotstung »

ForeverElvis wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 6:51 am
Igotstung wrote:
pmp wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 7:34 pm
Igotstung wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2024 4:02 pm
Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 11:06 pm
Yamaguchi.Y wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 1:19 pm
Interesting points, by everyone.

But, smt179 It's a mystery. Image
Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 10:45 am
If it was a cock-up it seems strange they would make the mistake on the Hurt single picture sleeve as well. Like was said, album design takes a while and it doesn’t seem likely that a mistake like that would slip by the RCA art department twice. I think it’s more likely that the album concept just wasn’t fully fleshed out.
Image

Jokerlola wrote:
Thu May 30, 2024 11:01 am
It may not have necessarily helped sell any more units but it may have caused more interest in the album if the fact that it was recorded at Graceland had been promoted more. The title alludes to it without any explanation. It could have even been as simple as using the mock up letter by Elvis on the back of the album saying something like: “Dear friends, thank you for your loyalty. I sincerely hope you enjoy my new RCA album that I recorded at my beloved home, Graceland. Best wishes, Elvis Presley

Btw, even at the time in 1976, I thought this mock up letter on the back of the album was strange.
I have seen multiple "originals" of EP-signed letterheads used for the back of the Blvd. album. Multiples. Multiple mock ups that were signed.

smt201
I remember first seeing that picture sleeve and being excited that the new album was going to be a new “live album”.

I didn’t finish my thought about the back mock up letter; I thought it was strange at the time because I thought it was a sort of acknowledgement that he had been struggling for the past year and he was thanking the fans for being loyal to him through that. It also made the album seem more personal than (say) the Today album.

Getting back to the 74 live Memphis album cover. Although I’ve always liked that cover, I think one of the reasons that album didn’t sell as well is because Elvis’ picture was not on the cover. Elvis was the product and the attraction. His picture sold magazines which is why he was constantly on the cover of the movie magazines and the tabloids. So even though it was a rare creative cover from RCA, it still should have been a picture of Elvis on stage (Especially for a live album).
All the albums- live or studio- had the same old picture of jumpsuited Elvis on stage. This was a nice change and might have in fact given an impression that there would be a different set list and some focus on his Memphis roots(I always wondered why there were no tracks from his Memphis specific influences in the concert.)
To be fair, the set list on the original album was quite different to previous live discs:

I Got a Woman
Trying to Get to You
Rock medley
How Great Thou Art
Why Me Lord
Help Me
Lawdy Miss Clawdy
My Baby Left Me
Let Me Be There

That's two-thirds of the material not having been released in a concert setting (or, in some cases) at all. The fast-moving, rock-oriented material was quite different to the ballad heavy Aloha.

It's also worth adding that the 1974 release got excellent reviews from most critics, with some even putting it in the year-end list of best lps. I'm not sure the lack of anniversary link to That's all Right is surprising. Elvis fans are obsessed with anniversaries now, but not so much back then, and the Legendary Performer LP could be said to be marking that anniversary anyway.
My point was the Memphis connection, not anniversary. It was his hometown and he was performing there after 14 years there. It had emotional significance, more than historic.

There was an excellent reason to include not just his own songs recorded at Memphis Recording Service, but also local content which influenced him. What I'll Remember You was for Aloha, but magnified hundred times, because this is a place where he lived as a local legend, where he became a star, where he dreamed and where he got developed as a teen.
The connection to Sun or American just wouldn’t have been recognized in the set list just because it was a show in Memphis.

This sort of nostalgic connection to events of the past has become more commonplace the last 30 years or so, maybe the further the events are in the rearview mirror. Or, just better marketing strategists today.

At the time, we didn’t think about anniversaries of such things. Elvis was still a current artist, it was just another album. Elvis himself didn’t spend time recognizing past accomplishments either. A good example of that is the 50’s hits that were run through quickly or in a medley. Elvis would rather be singing Help Me or Let Me Be There rather than Hound Dog or Love Me Tender.
I hear you. This looking for nostalgic connection is modern phenomenon. Elvis was an active artist with preferences other than his old hits. He gave an excellent concert. We wanting a meta narrative on a 50 year old concert is post facto wishful thinking.

Yes.

But, Memphis was not just a concept or nostalgic connection for Elvis. The city was a bedrock of his life for more than two decades. Most major landmarks of his life happened in Memphis. Growing up as a music hungry teen, getting a launch, becoming a star, buying Graceland, his mother's death, his daughter's birth. He put roots there which is bound to be far more meaningful than just another city where he is giving a concert.

If, and mind you I am not taking away anything from the excellent concert he finally gave, there had been reimagined influences and old hits from Sun, I believe it would have been poignant, soulful and meaningful for Elvis & Memphis audience.

That is all.



User avatar

jetblack
Posts: 4728
Registered for: 19 years 10 months
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne, England
Has thanked: 6089 times
Been thanked: 5417 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by jetblack »

Jokerlola wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 12:11 am
Elvis was the product so I think that any album project needed his picture somewhere on the album cover. The live Memphis album sold poorly and I think it was one factor.
'Elvis Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis' sold around half a million copies. It stayed on the Billboard album chart for 13 weeks, four of those in the top 40 with a peak position of #33.

Andy


Elvis - King of the UK charts

User avatar

DearGeorgie
Posts: 990
Registered for: 11 years 11 months
Has thanked: 582 times
Been thanked: 713 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by DearGeorgie »

jetblack wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 4:17 pm
Jokerlola wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 12:11 am
Elvis was the product so I think that any album project needed his picture somewhere on the album cover. The live Memphis album sold poorly and I think it was one factor.
'Elvis Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis' sold around half a million copies. It stayed on the Billboard album chart for 13 weeks, four of those in the top 40 with a peak position of #33.

Andy
Granted, it sold much better than his current studio albums, but compared to MSG and Aloha, the Memphis LP sold much less. It was becoming apparent that putting out so many live albums in a short period of time was no longer a guarantee of huge sales. Elvis needed to dramatically change the set list or perhaps do another album like ON STAGE where it's comprised of all "new" songs that nobody had heard Elvis sing before. He did seem to make an attempt in August of '74 to revamp the show, but that didn't last long.



User avatar

jurasic1968
Posts: 12742
Registered for: 11 years 10 months
Has thanked: 14841 times
Been thanked: 2725 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by jurasic1968 »

The Memphis 1974 live LP was very good, in my opinion. Better than other live LP's released before.



User avatar

Topic author
Igotstung
Posts: 134
Registered for: 7 months
Has thanked: 126 times
Been thanked: 142 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Igotstung »

jurasic1968 wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 5:42 pm
The Memphis 1974 live LP was very good, in my opinion. Better than other live LP's released before.
It is very good. I like all the big three of the era- MSG, ALOHA & MEMPHIS. They are also distinctly different listening experiences.

The audience interaction is so good on the Memphis album( just like MSG). I always get a kick out of one guy who guffaws loudly at the beginning of I Got A Woman. Elvis is kidding with the loud woman in the audience and teasing with the deep voiced ' well... well...welll', and he says ' I said that Didn't I', and the guffawing guy answers - ' Yes!!'. Elvis is kinda non-plussed I guess.



User avatar

CountCanada
Posts: 1418
Registered for: 9 years 4 months
Has thanked: 1160 times
Been thanked: 972 times
Age: 60

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by CountCanada »

In my opinion, 1962 was the best year for Elvis' voice. Just listen to some ballads on the Pot Luck studio album...OMG!!! Nothing is as smooth as "Anything That's Part Of You". Just sayin...lol



User avatar

Topic author
Igotstung
Posts: 134
Registered for: 7 months
Has thanked: 126 times
Been thanked: 142 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Igotstung »

CountCanada wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 7:30 pm
In my opinion, 1962 was the best year for Elvis' voice. Just listen to some ballads on the Pot Luck studio album...OMG!!! Nothing is as smooth as "Anything That's Part Of You". Just sayin...lol
I think there are various distinct voices, and different people prefer different voices/ vocal styles.




FredAistair
Posts: 1204
Registered for: 12 years 7 months
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 475 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by FredAistair »

CountCanada wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 7:30 pm
In my opinion, 1962 was the best year for Elvis' voice. Just listen to some ballads on the Pot Luck studio album...OMG!!! Nothing is as smooth as "Anything That's Part Of You". Just sayin...lol
I often use this song as an example of Elvis's great vocal versatility when people try to compare other vocalists to him, I say let them try and sing this as smoothly or sweetly or longingly, go ahead and try Ray, Tom, Willie etc etc



User avatar

Jokerlola
Posts: 2133
Registered for: 13 years 8 months
Has thanked: 404 times
Been thanked: 1186 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Jokerlola »

Something much more could have been made of this release, being somewhat of a milestone of his first performance in Memphis in 14 years. Although as a young fan in 74, I was aware of the significance of the year and the place, I also didn’t expect any acknowledgement, just like there was no acknowledgement of his 20 years since his first big year in 76.

I welcomed the release with its several new and different songs compared to the other live albums but I remember thinking of it as half hearted release that doesn’t even mention the significance on the album cove and you only know about it from Elvis’ final words before ICHFIL.



User avatar

Yamaguchi.Y
Posts: 651
Registered for: 10 years 4 months
Has thanked: 955 times
Been thanked: 652 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Yamaguchi.Y »

Jokerlola wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2024 10:39 pm
Something much more could have been made of this release, being somewhat of a milestone of his first performance in Memphis in 14 years. Although as a young fan in 74, I was aware of the significance of the year and the place, I also didn’t expect any acknowledgement, just like there was no acknowledgement of his 20 years since his first big year in 76.

I welcomed the release with its several new and different songs compared to the other live albums but I remember thinking of it as half hearted release that doesn’t even mention the significance on the album cove and you only know about it from Elvis’ final words before ICHFIL.
This post, :smt023 :smt041 :smt045 smt125 smt200 smt201 :smt038 :smt034 8) !!

(Quoted For Truth.) It echos my exact same thoughts, feelings, and experience.

Memphis 74.png
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


— "Just enjoy yourself, that's what the whole thing's about." (EP, '76)

User avatar

pmp
Posts: 9027
Registered for: 5 years 2 months
Has thanked: 1448 times
Been thanked: 8488 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by pmp »

DearGeorgie wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 5:30 pm
jetblack wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 4:17 pm
Jokerlola wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 12:11 am
Elvis was the product so I think that any album project needed his picture somewhere on the album cover. The live Memphis album sold poorly and I think it was one factor.
'Elvis Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis' sold around half a million copies. It stayed on the Billboard album chart for 13 weeks, four of those in the top 40 with a peak position of #33.

Andy
Granted, it sold much better than his current studio albums, but compared to MSG and Aloha, the Memphis LP sold much less. It was becoming apparent that putting out so many live albums in a short period of time was no longer a guarantee of huge sales. Elvis needed to dramatically change the set list or perhaps do another album like ON STAGE where it's comprised of all "new" songs that nobody had heard Elvis sing before. He did seem to make an attempt in August of '74 to revamp the show, but that didn't last long.
As already pointed out, two thirds of the songs on the album hadn't appeared on previous live albums, and so the setlist had changed. We can see this by comparing the setlist with Aloha, 15 months earlier. Fourteen songs from that Memphis show were NOT in Aloha. And thirteen songs from Aloha were not in Memphis. That's roughly 50% of the show changed in the space of just over a year. That's a pretty big percentage - bigger, I would argue, than most acts performing during that time period. And if we compare March 1974 to March 1975, the change in repertoire is even clearer. The idea that Elvis didn't change his repertoire is, by and large, nonsense. Sure, the argument sticks once you get to the summer of 1975 - he resorts back to the Memphis '74 type of line-up, with a few songs from Today thrown in, and it didn't really change after that. But through March 1975, there IS a change in repertoire.


Accused of being "a nerd in his 20s." I wish.

Image

User avatar

Topic author
Igotstung
Posts: 134
Registered for: 7 months
Has thanked: 126 times
Been thanked: 142 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Igotstung »

pmp wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2024 2:21 am
DearGeorgie wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 5:30 pm
jetblack wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 4:17 pm
Jokerlola wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 12:11 am
Elvis was the product so I think that any album project needed his picture somewhere on the album cover. The live Memphis album sold poorly and I think it was one factor.
'Elvis Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis' sold around half a million copies. It stayed on the Billboard album chart for 13 weeks, four of those in the top 40 with a peak position of #33.

Andy
Granted, it sold much better than his current studio albums, but compared to MSG and Aloha, the Memphis LP sold much less. It was becoming apparent that putting out so many live albums in a short period of time was no longer a guarantee of huge sales. Elvis needed to dramatically change the set list or perhaps do another album like ON STAGE where it's comprised of all "new" songs that nobody had heard Elvis sing before. He did seem to make an attempt in August of '74 to revamp the show, but that didn't last long.
As already pointed out, two thirds of the songs on the album hadn't appeared on previous live albums, and so the setlist had changed. We can see this by comparing the setlist with Aloha, 15 months earlier. Fourteen songs from that Memphis show were NOT in Aloha. And thirteen songs from Aloha were not in Memphis. That's roughly 50% of the show changed in the space of just over a year. That's a pretty big percentage - bigger, I would argue, than most acts performing during that time period. And if we compare March 1974 to March 1975, the change in repertoire is even clearer. The idea that Elvis didn't change his repertoire is, by and large, nonsense. Sure, the argument sticks once you get to the summer of 1975 - he resorts back to the Memphis '74 type of line-up, with a few songs from Today thrown in, and it didn't really change after that. But through March 1975, there IS a change in repertoire.
Agree.

And for the attending audience, at whom the concerts were essentially aimed, may not know if the songs were repeated, nor would they care.

Even consumers of the big four live albums released during his lifetime, got enough variety.



User avatar

pmp
Posts: 9027
Registered for: 5 years 2 months
Has thanked: 1448 times
Been thanked: 8488 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by pmp »

Igotstung wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2024 6:43 am
pmp wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2024 2:21 am
DearGeorgie wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 5:30 pm
jetblack wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2024 4:17 pm
Jokerlola wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 12:11 am
Elvis was the product so I think that any album project needed his picture somewhere on the album cover. The live Memphis album sold poorly and I think it was one factor.
'Elvis Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis' sold around half a million copies. It stayed on the Billboard album chart for 13 weeks, four of those in the top 40 with a peak position of #33.

Andy
Granted, it sold much better than his current studio albums, but compared to MSG and Aloha, the Memphis LP sold much less. It was becoming apparent that putting out so many live albums in a short period of time was no longer a guarantee of huge sales. Elvis needed to dramatically change the set list or perhaps do another album like ON STAGE where it's comprised of all "new" songs that nobody had heard Elvis sing before. He did seem to make an attempt in August of '74 to revamp the show, but that didn't last long.
As already pointed out, two thirds of the songs on the album hadn't appeared on previous live albums, and so the setlist had changed. We can see this by comparing the setlist with Aloha, 15 months earlier. Fourteen songs from that Memphis show were NOT in Aloha. And thirteen songs from Aloha were not in Memphis. That's roughly 50% of the show changed in the space of just over a year. That's a pretty big percentage - bigger, I would argue, than most acts performing during that time period. And if we compare March 1974 to March 1975, the change in repertoire is even clearer. The idea that Elvis didn't change his repertoire is, by and large, nonsense. Sure, the argument sticks once you get to the summer of 1975 - he resorts back to the Memphis '74 type of line-up, with a few songs from Today thrown in, and it didn't really change after that. But through March 1975, there IS a change in repertoire.
Agree.

And for the attending audience, at whom the concerts were essentially aimed, may not know if the songs were repeated, nor would they care.

Even consumers of the big four live albums released during his lifetime, got enough variety.
Yeah, that's true. Although there is some laziness given that Elvis knew he was being recorded - Love Me, Trilogy, and I Can't Stop Loving You on three live albums in just over two years. It should have been possible to include three decent songs in their place by 1974. And ICSLY was on In Person, too! Even bringing back Bridge instead of Trilogy would have worked, as there had been no live version released by that point (although I admit many thought there had been because of the overdubbed applause). Despite plenty of evidence of the changing setlist, it's easy to see where the myth comes from that the shows stayed the same.


Accused of being "a nerd in his 20s." I wish.

Image

User avatar

Christopher Brown
Posts: 1844
Registered for: 21 years
Has thanked: 308 times
Been thanked: 1703 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Christopher Brown »

His changing voice is why I still constantly listen to Elvis more than 55 years after really discovering him. I can't seem to get enough. The change in his voice from the early '60s, to the mid '60s, to Memphis '68, to the many live shows captured by RCA, to the Nashville recordings and on through and including the MOODY BLUE album recordings all give me different 'voices' to enjoy, though unmistakenly Elvis. Even many of the soundtracks offer great enjoyment (though there are many songs I wish he'd never done), with favourites being BLUE HAWAII, GIRLS! GIRLS! GIRLS, KID GALAHAD, FUN IN ACAPULCO, KISSIN' COUSINS (okay, half at least -- but his voice was SO good), SPINOUT and the last four movies -- his voice was amazing. His various movie musical styles, whether "real" or not, provided different listening experiences, e.g., HARUM SCARUM, KING CREOLE, FRANKIE AND JOHNNY. So much material to enjoy.


Christopher Brown

User avatar

Topic author
Igotstung
Posts: 134
Registered for: 7 months
Has thanked: 126 times
Been thanked: 142 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Igotstung »

Christopher Brown wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2024 3:44 pm
His changing voice is why I still constantly listen to Elvis more than 55 years after really discovering him. I can't seem to get enough. The change in his voice from the early '60s, to the mid '60s, to Memphis '68, to the many live shows captured by RCA, to the Nashville recordings and on through and including the MOODY BLUE album recordings all give me different 'voices' to enjoy, though unmistakenly Elvis. Even many of the soundtracks offer great enjoyment (though there are many songs I wish he'd never done), with favourites being BLUE HAWAII, GIRLS! GIRLS! GIRLS, KID GALAHAD, FUN IN ACAPULCO, KISSIN' COUSINS (okay, half at least -- but his voice was SO good), SPINOUT and the last four movies -- his voice was amazing. His various movie musical styles, whether "real" or not, provided different listening experiences, e.g., HARUM SCARUM, KING CREOLE, FRANKIE AND JOHNNY. So much material to enjoy.
The way the voice fit various genres, in fact combined them in one single distinct sound, and repertoire in various musical styles is a big part of Presley's appeal.



User avatar

bajo
Posts: 5860
Registered for: 21 years 2 months
Location: N-6450
Has thanked: 1791 times
Been thanked: 1397 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by bajo »

shiatsujake wrote:
Tue May 21, 2024 2:13 pm
Just listen to,You Don't Know Me,and compare the film version to the studio version the following year.Very different vocally.
That is one of the points of Elvis' singing that has always puzzeld me! The soundtrack version is awful imo. But, when in studio, it's a classic in my book! :smt020


"If you love me let me know, if you don't, ....move it!"

User avatar

Topic author
Igotstung
Posts: 134
Registered for: 7 months
Has thanked: 126 times
Been thanked: 142 times

Re: Elvis Voice change

Post by Igotstung »

bajo wrote:
Sat Jun 15, 2024 9:17 pm
shiatsujake wrote:
Tue May 21, 2024 2:13 pm
Just listen to,You Don't Know Me,and compare the film version to the studio version the following year.Very different vocally.
That is one of the points of Elvis' singing that has always puzzeld me! The soundtrack version is awful imo. But, when in studio, it's a classic in my book! :smt020
Vocal delivery is different, but the 'voice' as such doesn't change between the two versions.