Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Greystoke »

After listening to Madison's Breathing Out Fire CD last week, I thought it was a good time to stay on the same tour and listen to another concert from this problematic period, and my choice was FTD's Dragonheart release. The concert itself is from five days earlier on October 1st, 1974, in South Bend, Indiana. Where Elvis was also under par and sounding high as a kite, but he was clearly alert and humorous, although there are moments where signs of irritation are on display as he soon tells the audience not to shout out any songs. Which Elvis tries to mask with some humour, but there's some professionalism and charm amiss here.

C.C. Rider is the customary opening number, and it's pretty flat, as is a lifeless I Got a Woman, during which Elvis makes a quip about Tom Jones, as he bumps and grinds. Comments about twenty years going down the drain and binoculars looking like frogs are familiar, although he also asks how much the building holds, and is informed that it's twelve-and-a-half thousand. A quick check reveals that 12,301 were in attendance on this night and the following night in the same arena, Notre Dame's Athletic & Convention Center.

The crowd is ecstatic, although Elvis could sing his next song, Love Me, in his sleep, whilst Blue Suede Shoes is feeble. Elvis also sounds quite impatient again when he interacts with the audience, commenting that he was raised in the Assembly of God Church, where "people shout," before audibly relishing in a performance of It's Midnight.

Big Boss Man follows and is no better than adequate, with Elvis goofing around quite a bit, although James Burton's guitar is very clear and he puts in some appealing licks. The crowd interaction continues before Fever, which Elvis and the audience seem to be having fun with, whilst Love Me Tender is little more than routine, although he does ask what age a young fan is, before commenting that his little girl is six years-old.

The messing around continues into Hound Dog, which Elvis starts with a growl, and he follows this with Heartbreak Hotel, which starts aggressively and with some swagger, but ends up messy.

There's more growling and snarling in If You Love Me (Let Me Know), although the piano lines are very clear here and nice to pick up on. Similarly, the brass, drums, and piano are also easy to single out during Bridge Over Troubled Water, which is marred by ad-libbing, vocalising, and general heavy-handedness on Elvis's part. Although he does say that he wants to do a good version.

Elvis still sounds quite irritated as he introduces his band members, making comment beforehand about a speaker blowing during Bridge Over Troubled Water, then getting annoyed again when it crackles as he speaks. This said, he does run with Lawdy Miss Clawdy, which Glen Hardin plays during his introduction, and it's a fun version that has some swing to it.

All Shook Up and Teddy Bear are little more than run-of-the-mill, but Elvis is playful on Don't Be Cruel, and tries to enliven the song in parts, although this is a song that needed due care and attention to work better in concert.

Conversely, Elvis gives more to Let Me Be There than he does his own hits, and whilst the obligatory reprise is a bit rough, this is an unremarkable performance of a song that could be fun in Elvis's hands. But not on this night.

It's Now Or Never follows and Elvis messes up the lyrics at the start, but I like the tempo here, and Elvis is trying to sing softly, but a compulsion to vocalise spoils the better aspects of this rendition. Which is somewhat of a double-edged sword, because Elvis sounds like he's trying, he just doesn't have the vocal capabilities to make these songs work in the absence of better singing and greater control of artistry, and instead is reaching for any port in a storm.

The same applies to You Gave Me a Mountain, where Elvis speaks, shouts, and undoubtedly tries to dig deep into the lyrics of a song that surely resonated with him. But this isn't a good version. Whilst the desire or desperation to get loud continues with Johnny B. Goode, after which Elvis talks about the Band-Aids on his hands, his rings, and Aloha from Hawaii. Which leads to a serviceable version of Hawaiian Wedding Song.

At this point, Elvis bows to a request and sings Steamroller Blues in fairly rudimentary fashion, then brings the show to a close with Can't Help Falling in Love being nothing more than functional. And whilst this isn't a good concert by any stretch of the imagination, it isn't a disaster either, and on the night, being there in person may not have been a totally disappointing experience. At least for audience members who may not have seen Elvis in person before.

There's also three bonus tracks -- a rough sounding Alright, Okay, You Win, from September 29th in Detroit, which is good to have at least. Whilst Elvis seems determined to ruin some of his own performances at this time as he does just this with a rendition of Trying to Get go You in College Park, which follows a banal run through of Blue Christmas from the same show.

With regards to what the release actually represents, I think it was worthwhile at the time in respect to FTD offering what was a hitherto unreleased soundboard recording, although everything they released wasn't going to be gold. Not then. Not now. Especially when Elvis could be so unpredictable during certain tours.

With this release, I think anybody that owned or had heard other concerts from this tour had some idea what to expect. Twenty years later, it's but one of many unremarkable concerts that has been released by FTD and import labels alike, however, it was something new on the table from a label that's still going all these years later. But it might be 20 years before I listen to it again.
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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Johnny2523 »

SpyGuyUK wrote:
Sat Feb 11, 2023 12:32 am
Greystoke wrote:
Sat Feb 11, 2023 12:02 am
Madison's Breathing Out Fire CD, which features Elvis's October 6th, 1974, evening show in Dayton, Ohio. It's a pretty rough show for the most part, especially when Elvis takes to the stage at first. This was a problematic tour in numerous respects, and whilst Elvis is audibly struggling, it does sound like he's at least trying to put on a show as the concert progresses. He doesn't manage to truly come to life and his singing is often below par, but at least his mood isn't sour, which is a small mercy.

I hadn't listened to this concert in years and thought on a whim that it was worth revisiting. The design of the booklet is appealing and the choice of photographs are sufficient enough for my liking as somebody who isn't inclined to buy a lot of Elvis photo books.


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I thought I had this show on The Profile Boxset Vol 2 but it's the matinee show. I'm tempted to listen to this one again to see if it's any better than the Evening show that you listened to. I think a lot of the time it's not just the medication I think that Elvis is tired a lot of the time.

I'm sure this matinee show is on another CD title but right off hand I can't think what. About 10 years ago or so nearly all the CD's had lavish booklets with great information and photos pertaining to the show. I don't think you get that as much these days.
Best release thus far when it comes to these shows imho, it collects them both in great sound quality and a nice quality booklet (longbox format) to boot.
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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by SpyGuyUK »

Greystoke wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2023 10:24 pm
After listening to Madison's Breathing Out Fire CD last week, I thought it was a good time to stay on the same tour and listen to another concert from this problematic period, and my choice was FTD's Dragonheart release. The concert itself is from five days earlier on October 1st, 1974, in South Bend, Indiana. Where Elvis was also under par and sounding high as a kite, but he was clearly alert and humorous, although there are moments where signs of irritation are on display as he soon tells the audience not to shout out any songs. Which Elvis tries to mask with some humour, but there's some professionalism and charm amiss here.

C.C. Rider is the customary opening number, and it's pretty flat, as is a lifeless I Got a Woman, during which Elvis makes a quip about Tom Jones, as he bumps and grinds. Comments about twenty years going down the drain and binoculars looking like frogs are familiar, although he also asks how much the building holds, and is informed that it's twelve-and-a-half thousand. A quick check reveals that 12,301 were in attendance on this night and the following night in the same arena, Notre Dame's Athletic & Convention Center.

The crowd is ecstatic, although Elvis could sing his next song, Love Me, in his sleep, whilst Blue Suede Shoes is feeble. Elvis also sounds quite impatient again when he interacts with the audience, commenting that he was raised in the Assembly of God Church, where "people shout," before audibly relishing in a performance of It's Midnight.

Big Boss Man follows and is no better than adequate, with Elvis goofing around quite a bit, although James Burton's guitar is very clear and he puts in some appealing licks. The crowd interaction continues before Fever, which Elvis and the audience seem to be having fun with, whilst Love Me Tender is little more than routine, although he does ask what age a young fan is, before commenting that his little girl is six years-old.

The messing around continues into Hound Dog, which Elvis starts with a growl, and he follows this with Heartbreak Hotel, which starts aggressively and with some swagger, but ends up messy.

There's more growling and snarling in If You Love Me (Let Me Know), although the piano lines are very clear here and nice to pick up on. Similarly, the brass, drums, and piano are also easy to single out during Bridge Over Troubled Water, which is marred by ad-libbing, vocalising, and general heavy-handedness on Elvis's part. Although he does say that he wants to do a good version.

Elvis still sounds quite irritated as he introduces his band members, making comment beforehand about a speaker blowing during Bridge Over Troubled Water, then getting annoyed again when it crackles as he speaks. This said, he does run with Lawdy Miss Clawdy, which Glen Hardin plays during his introduction, and it's a fun version that has some swing to it.

All Shook Up and Teddy Bear are little more than run-of-the-mill, but Elvis is playful on Don't Be Cruel, and tries to enliven the song in parts, although this is a song that needed due care and attention to work better in concert.

Conversely, Elvis gives more to Let Me Be There than he does his own hits, and whilst the obligatory reprise is a bit rough, this is an unremarkable performance of a song that could be fun in Elvis's hands. But not on this night.

It's Now Or Never follows and Elvis messes up the lyrics at the start, but I like the tempo here, and Elvis is trying to sing softly, but a compulsion to vocalise spoils the better aspects of this rendition. Which is somewhat of a double-edged sword, because Elvis sounds like he's trying, he just doesn't have the vocal capabilities to make these songs work in the absence of better singing and greater control of artistry, and instead is reaching for any port in a storm.

The same applies to You Gave Me a Mountain, where Elvis speaks, shouts, and undoubtedly tries to dig deep into the lyrics of a song that surely resonated with him. But this isn't a good version. Whilst the desire or desperation to get loud continues with Johnny B. Goode, after which Elvis talks about the Band-Aids on his hands, his rings, and Aloha from Hawaii. Which leads to a serviceable version of Hawaiian Wedding Song.

At this point, Elvis bows to a request and sings Steamroller Blues in fairly rudimentary fashion, then brings the show to a close with Can't Help Falling in Love being nothing more than functional. And whilst this isn't a good concert by any stretch of the imagination, it isn't a disaster either, and on the night, being there in person may not have been a totally disappointing experience. At least for audience members who may not have seen Elvis in person before.

There's also three bonus tracks -- a rough sounding Alright, Okay, You Win, from September 29th in Detroit, which is good to have at least. Whilst Elvis seems determined to ruin some of his own performances at this time as he does just this with a rendition of Trying to Get go You in College Park, which follows a banal run through of Blue Christmas from the same show.

With regards to what the release actually represents, I think it was worthwhile at the time in respect to FTD offering what was a hitherto unreleased soundboard recording, although everything they released wasn't going to be gold. Not then. Not now. Especially when Elvis could be so unpredictable during certain tours.

With this release, I think anybody that owned or had heard other concerts from this tour had some idea what to expect. Twenty years later, it's but one of many unremarkable concerts that has been released by FTD and import labels alike, however, it was something new on the table from a label that's still going all these years later. But it might be 20 years before I listen to it again.

Image
Good analysis and In-Depth review. That's two shows that I won't go to for a while and I have heard not very favourable reviews about Dragonheart before but I will go to the October 6th Matinee show 1974 to see if it's any better than the Evening show you listened to. I have to tell you though I'm not always analysing the shows unless something is obvious. However because there is so many to choose from I've made a list of shows I am listening to and I give them a marks out of ten rating for both Enjoyability and Sound Quality so that I don't revisit not very good shows too often or go back to them at all! Did you like the sound quality?



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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by SpyGuyUK »

Johnny2523 wrote:
Mon Feb 13, 2023 2:42 am
SpyGuyUK wrote:
Sat Feb 11, 2023 12:32 am
Greystoke wrote:
Sat Feb 11, 2023 12:02 am
Madison's Breathing Out Fire CD, which features Elvis's October 6th, 1974, evening show in Dayton, Ohio. It's a pretty rough show for the most part, especially when Elvis takes to the stage at first. This was a problematic tour in numerous respects, and whilst Elvis is audibly struggling, it does sound like he's at least trying to put on a show as the concert progresses. He doesn't manage to truly come to life and his singing is often below par, but at least his mood isn't sour, which is a small mercy.

I hadn't listened to this concert in years and thought on a whim that it was worth revisiting. The design of the booklet is appealing and the choice of photographs are sufficient enough for my liking as somebody who isn't inclined to buy a lot of Elvis photo books.


Image
I thought I had this show on The Profile Boxset Vol 2 but it's the matinee show. I'm tempted to listen to this one again to see if it's any better than the Evening show that you listened to. I think a lot of the time it's not just the medication I think that Elvis is tired a lot of the time.

I'm sure this matinee show is on another CD title but right off hand I can't think what. About 10 years ago or so nearly all the CD's had lavish booklets with great information and photos pertaining to the show. I don't think you get that as much these days.
Best release thus far when it comes to these shows imho, it collects them both in great sound quality and a nice quality booklet (longbox format) to boot.
Image
Well spotted Johnny! I'm glad you showed this as here am I talking to Greystoke about these concerts and as I mentioned I have the Oct 6th Matinee show on The Profile Boxset Vol. 2...and wait for it yes, I have Dayton Reloaded Boxset too. Such a dumb, dumb forgetting that it was both the October 6th shows on this set too!

This is what happens when you collect so much you get mixed up sometimes. In fact I've been writing down the Elvis shows I've listened to. The trouble is when you listen to so many Elvis concerts taking notes can be a hassle!

I would guess that the Reloaded version will be better than the Madison version. Anyone disagree and anyone think the October 6th Matinee show was better than Evening show?



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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Greystoke »

SpyGuyUK wrote:
Mon Feb 13, 2023 7:14 am
Greystoke wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2023 10:24 pm
After listening to Madison's Breathing Out Fire CD last week, I thought it was a good time to stay on the same tour and listen to another concert from this problematic period, and my choice was FTD's Dragonheart release. The concert itself is from five days earlier on October 1st, 1974, in South Bend, Indiana. Where Elvis was also under par and sounding high as a kite, but he was clearly alert and humorous, although there are moments where signs of irritation are on display as he soon tells the audience not to shout out any songs. Which Elvis tries to mask with some humour, but there's some professionalism and charm amiss here.

C.C. Rider is the customary opening number, and it's pretty flat, as is a lifeless I Got a Woman, during which Elvis makes a quip about Tom Jones, as he bumps and grinds. Comments about twenty years going down the drain and binoculars looking like frogs are familiar, although he also asks how much the building holds, and is informed that it's twelve-and-a-half thousand. A quick check reveals that 12,301 were in attendance on this night and the following night in the same arena, Notre Dame's Athletic & Convention Center.

The crowd is ecstatic, although Elvis could sing his next song, Love Me, in his sleep, whilst Blue Suede Shoes is feeble. Elvis also sounds quite impatient again when he interacts with the audience, commenting that he was raised in the Assembly of God Church, where "people shout," before audibly relishing in a performance of It's Midnight.

Big Boss Man follows and is no better than adequate, with Elvis goofing around quite a bit, although James Burton's guitar is very clear and he puts in some appealing licks. The crowd interaction continues before Fever, which Elvis and the audience seem to be having fun with, whilst Love Me Tender is little more than routine, although he does ask what age a young fan is, before commenting that his little girl is six years-old.

The messing around continues into Hound Dog, which Elvis starts with a growl, and he follows this with Heartbreak Hotel, which starts aggressively and with some swagger, but ends up messy.

There's more growling and snarling in If You Love Me (Let Me Know), although the piano lines are very clear here and nice to pick up on. Similarly, the brass, drums, and piano are also easy to single out during Bridge Over Troubled Water, which is marred by ad-libbing, vocalising, and general heavy-handedness on Elvis's part. Although he does say that he wants to do a good version.

Elvis still sounds quite irritated as he introduces his band members, making comment beforehand about a speaker blowing during Bridge Over Troubled Water, then getting annoyed again when it crackles as he speaks. This said, he does run with Lawdy Miss Clawdy, which Glen Hardin plays during his introduction, and it's a fun version that has some swing to it.

All Shook Up and Teddy Bear are little more than run-of-the-mill, but Elvis is playful on Don't Be Cruel, and tries to enliven the song in parts, although this is a song that needed due care and attention to work better in concert.

Conversely, Elvis gives more to Let Me Be There than he does his own hits, and whilst the obligatory reprise is a bit rough, this is an unremarkable performance of a song that could be fun in Elvis's hands. But not on this night.

It's Now Or Never follows and Elvis messes up the lyrics at the start, but I like the tempo here, and Elvis is trying to sing softly, but a compulsion to vocalise spoils the better aspects of this rendition. Which is somewhat of a double-edged sword, because Elvis sounds like he's trying, he just doesn't have the vocal capabilities to make these songs work in the absence of better singing and greater control of artistry, and instead is reaching for any port in a storm.

The same applies to You Gave Me a Mountain, where Elvis speaks, shouts, and undoubtedly tries to dig deep into the lyrics of a song that surely resonated with him. But this isn't a good version. Whilst the desire or desperation to get loud continues with Johnny B. Goode, after which Elvis talks about the Band-Aids on his hands, his rings, and Aloha from Hawaii. Which leads to a serviceable version of Hawaiian Wedding Song.

At this point, Elvis bows to a request and sings Steamroller Blues in fairly rudimentary fashion, then brings the show to a close with Can't Help Falling in Love being nothing more than functional. And whilst this isn't a good concert by any stretch of the imagination, it isn't a disaster either, and on the night, being there in person may not have been a totally disappointing experience. At least for audience members who may not have seen Elvis in person before.

There's also three bonus tracks -- a rough sounding Alright, Okay, You Win, from September 29th in Detroit, which is good to have at least. Whilst Elvis seems determined to ruin some of his own performances at this time as he does just this with a rendition of Trying to Get go You in College Park, which follows a banal run through of Blue Christmas from the same show.

With regards to what the release actually represents, I think it was worthwhile at the time in respect to FTD offering what was a hitherto unreleased soundboard recording, although everything they released wasn't going to be gold. Not then. Not now. Especially when Elvis could be so unpredictable during certain tours.

With this release, I think anybody that owned or had heard other concerts from this tour had some idea what to expect. Twenty years later, it's but one of many unremarkable concerts that has been released by FTD and import labels alike, however, it was something new on the table from a label that's still going all these years later. But it might be 20 years before I listen to it again.

Image
Good analysis and In-Depth review. That's two shows that I won't go to for a while and I have heard not very favourable reviews about Dragonheart before but I will go to the October 6th Matinee show 1974 to see if it's any better than the Evening show you listened to. I have to tell you though I'm not always analysing the shows unless something is obvious. However because there is so many to choose from I've made a list of shows I am listening to and I give them a marks out of ten rating for both Enjoyability and Sound Quality so that I don't revisit not very good shows too often or go back to them at all! Did you like the sound quality?
I wouldn't say that the audio is much more than acceptable for a soundboard release, but for me, when it comes to soundboards, providing they're audible and clear, I'm satisfied.



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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Rob »

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One of the first bootlegs I bought on LP decades ago. Nice to hear it again on a shiny, silver CD. I always laugh at Charlie Hodge and his Gomer Pyle impression during his introduction.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by vinelvis »

I listened to the May 2 1976 10 p.m. performance ("dinner show"). Although I enjoyed the show, it's very slow. Elvis talks a lot and even does this during breaks in I Got a Woman and Teddy Bear / Don't be cruel. On the positive side, Elvis sings well and performs three "showstoppers": My Way, American Trilogy and Hurt (three times!). The crowd also seemed to like Burning Love a lot. All in all, kinda good show but a tad too slow.



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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Rob »

Image

Not the best sound by far, but a very solid and fast paced show with very little banter with the audience.

No complaints from this fan.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Elvis2000 »

Las Vegas '71.jpg
Las Vegas 1975.jpg
Disc two on both, good shows. Only downside to the April 1st DS is that it's a short show, but the highlights are Burning Love (one of the best versions imo), Let Me Be There (best version after March 1974) and Fairytale is solid. When they return to the March 1975 shows, a three disc set featuring March 19, 30 and 31 MS would be an excellent release.
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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Christopher Brown »

As I continue to transfer audio cassettes I collected over three / four decades ago, I finally transferred May 7, 1976 MS From Lake Tahoe, Nevada. It's not complete, unfortunately, but it's terrific, and though Elvis is talkative, he sings his old hits well, and the 'newer' songs really well. It's another show I would have loved to have attended. My cassette runs 88 minutes, and I had to cut all the band solos, ALSO SPRACH ZARATHUSTRA, and one long talk to the audience to get it down to 79 minutes for an audio CD.

The sound is terrific, and it's a show I'll return to from time to time. I have other shows from this LAKE TAHOE season, but not in the sound quality of this. Everything is clear, and Elvis is easily understood. Even LOVE ME TENDER sung later in the show is well done, as is HURT which is sung fully through two times.

Elvis' vocals are strong, and I would see him in about 7 weeks at one of his better shows in the summer of '76 in Buffalo -- see attached photo taken from our third row seats on the side.

Also Sprach Zarathustra (opening slightly cut)
1 See See Rider
2 Medley: I Got A Woman / Amen (end repeated) / I Got A Woman
3 Medley: Love Me / BYE BYE BLACKBIRD (one line) / Love Me
4 If You Love Me, Let Me Know
5 You Gave Me A Mountain
Elvis talks about and names his first few records including BLUE MOON OF KENTUCKY
6 All Shook Up
7 Medley: Teddy Bear / Don't Be Cruel
8 The Wonder Of You
9 Happy Birthday To You (Cindy) VERY GOOD VERSION
10 That's All Right (Mama) (plays guitar)
11 Are You Lonesome Tonight? (false start - plays guitar) GREAT SOUND, PERFORMANCE
12 I'll Remember You (sings one verse, stops, starts again)
13 KU-U-I-PO (several lines)
14 Hawaiian Wedding Song (very short false start)
15 Polk Salad Annie (opening very slightly cut)
Introductions
The Sweet Inspirations
Sherrilll Nielsen
J. D. Sumner and the Stamps Quartet
Green, Green Grass Of Home (one line sung in a low voice, trying to imitate J.D.)
Larry Strickland
Ed Hill
Ed Enoch
Bill Baize
Kathy Westmoreland
John Wilkinson
16 Early Morning Rain (short version)
James Burton
17 What'd I Say
18 Johnny B. Goode
Ronnie Tutt (solo)
Jerry Scheff (solo)
Tony Brown (solo)
David Briggs (solo)
19 Love Letters
Charlie Hodge
Mr. Joe Guercio
Al Tranti Orchestra
20 School Days
21 My Way (doesn't complain about needing lyrics)
22 Jailhouse Rock
23 Love Me Tender (very nice)
23 Hurt
24 Hurt (very long intro)
25 Heartbreak Hotel
26 How Great Thou Art
27 Hound Dog
28 LOVE STORY (la la's several lines)
29 One Night (false start)
30 It's Now Or Never (incomplete near end)
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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by vinelvis »

Inspired by my own listening experience a few days ago and Christopher Browns review, I've decided to listen to another May 1976 show. It's a recording of the May 1 midnight show and I've listened to it on youtube. I enjoyed it very much! As in the previous show I've listened to, Elvis is very, very talkative and the show is a bit messy (especially I Got A Woman) but the crowd don't seem to mind. I didn't mind either as I very much enjoyed the show. It feels like Elvis is in the same mood as in June 1975, and I like it.

It's nice how Elvis starts with one line of When The Saints Go Marching in. It would have worked too I think, if he started it in the right key. I think Elvis was thrown off because he started it way lower than he should. Fun to hear how James immediately reacts and starts playing when the saints. I also like the one-liner of Delilah. I can't really hear what he says afterwards, but it looks like someone tells him that the key is wrong and he should start it in e minor? A pity he didn't try again. Nevertheless, fun show and solid sining. I've enjoyed it.



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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by YDKM »

Yes Elvis in Lake Tahoe 76' was all things, good,brilliant,hopeless and awful.... all in 1 season!


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by vinelvis »

I bought this CD this afternoon and I listened to the first show this evening. Although you can hear Elvis has a cold, I enjoyed the show. He's having some problems on the first songs, but after Steamroller Blues the show gets better. Seems into Blue Suede Shoes and sorta into Suspicious Minds (he doesn't sing all of it but he asks the band for a reprise). He also starts off I can't Stop Loving You with great power, which I didn't except but it was a nice surprise. Tomorrow I'm going to listen to the midnight show.
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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Christopher Brown »

Was in the process of transferring May 5, 1976 from Lake Tahoe, realized the sound wasn't as good as I thought, so stopped -- but kept HOUND DOG as it includes the rare "high-classed" verse.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by ale »

Christopher Brown wrote:
Fri Mar 03, 2023 2:33 am
Was in the process of transferring May 5, 1976 from Lake Tahoe, realized the sound wasn't as good as I thought, so stopped -- but kept HOUND DOG as it includes the rare "high-classed" verse.
I think that's the version of Douglas Roy....the impersonator that Elvis invited on stage.....great version by the way with guitar solo included



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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Rob »

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I'm not sure what kind of system everyone has, but trust me when I say that I have one that is top of the line. My Bose headphones definitely add to the listening experience as well. That said, this is the best sounding version of this show that I've ever heard. All other releases of this show are inferior in my collection. Not to mention the show itself is extremely good.

Recommended for those who collect such detritus.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by vinelvis »

I listened to A Capital Performance today. It was one of my first bootlegs and it became one of my favorite concerts (I know it's not all Jackson, but for the most part it is). I know it's not Elvis' best concert, but he sounds like he and the fans are enjoying themselves and so am I!



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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Hans »

1200x1200.jpg

The April 9th evening show at the Hampton Roads Coliseum from the new On Tour box. Great concert in all ways. I really think Elvis was at his best in 1972 and the sound is very good. Been constantly listening to it the last few weeks and keep enjoying it. This box to me is one of the best releases ever.
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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by londonflash »

Greystoke wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2023 10:24 pm
After listening to Madison's Breathing Out Fire CD last week, I thought it was a good time to stay on the same tour and listen to another concert from this problematic period, and my choice was FTD's Dragonheart release. The concert itself is from five days earlier on October 1st, 1974, in South Bend, Indiana. Where Elvis was also under par and sounding high as a kite, but he was clearly alert and humorous, although there are moments where signs of irritation are on display as he soon tells the audience not to shout out any songs. Which Elvis tries to mask with some humour, but there's some professionalism and charm amiss here.

C.C. Rider is the customary opening number, and it's pretty flat, as is a lifeless I Got a Woman, during which Elvis makes a quip about Tom Jones, as he bumps and grinds. Comments about twenty years going down the drain and binoculars looking like frogs are familiar, although he also asks how much the building holds, and is informed that it's twelve-and-a-half thousand. A quick check reveals that 12,301 were in attendance on this night and the following night in the same arena, Notre Dame's Athletic & Convention Center.

The crowd is ecstatic, although Elvis could sing his next song, Love Me, in his sleep, whilst Blue Suede Shoes is feeble. Elvis also sounds quite impatient again when he interacts with the audience, commenting that he was raised in the Assembly of God Church, where "people shout," before audibly relishing in a performance of It's Midnight.

Big Boss Man follows and is no better than adequate, with Elvis goofing around quite a bit, although James Burton's guitar is very clear and he puts in some appealing licks. The crowd interaction continues before Fever, which Elvis and the audience seem to be having fun with, whilst Love Me Tender is little more than routine, although he does ask what age a young fan is, before commenting that his little girl is six years-old.

The messing around continues into Hound Dog, which Elvis starts with a growl, and he follows this with Heartbreak Hotel, which starts aggressively and with some swagger, but ends up messy.

There's more growling and snarling in If You Love Me (Let Me Know), although the piano lines are very clear here and nice to pick up on. Similarly, the brass, drums, and piano are also easy to single out during Bridge Over Troubled Water, which is marred by ad-libbing, vocalising, and general heavy-handedness on Elvis's part. Although he does say that he wants to do a good version.

Elvis still sounds quite irritated as he introduces his band members, making comment beforehand about a speaker blowing during Bridge Over Troubled Water, then getting annoyed again when it crackles as he speaks. This said, he does run with Lawdy Miss Clawdy, which Glen Hardin plays during his introduction, and it's a fun version that has some swing to it.

All Shook Up and Teddy Bear are little more than run-of-the-mill, but Elvis is playful on Don't Be Cruel, and tries to enliven the song in parts, although this is a song that needed due care and attention to work better in concert.

Conversely, Elvis gives more to Let Me Be There than he does his own hits, and whilst the obligatory reprise is a bit rough, this is an unremarkable performance of a song that could be fun in Elvis's hands. But not on this night.

It's Now Or Never follows and Elvis messes up the lyrics at the start, but I like the tempo here, and Elvis is trying to sing softly, but a compulsion to vocalise spoils the better aspects of this rendition. Which is somewhat of a double-edged sword, because Elvis sounds like he's trying, he just doesn't have the vocal capabilities to make these songs work in the absence of better singing and greater control of artistry, and instead is reaching for any port in a storm.

The same applies to You Gave Me a Mountain, where Elvis speaks, shouts, and undoubtedly tries to dig deep into the lyrics of a song that surely resonated with him. But this isn't a good version. Whilst the desire or desperation to get loud continues with Johnny B. Goode, after which Elvis talks about the Band-Aids on his hands, his rings, and Aloha from Hawaii. Which leads to a serviceable version of Hawaiian Wedding Song.

At this point, Elvis bows to a request and sings Steamroller Blues in fairly rudimentary fashion, then brings the show to a close with Can't Help Falling in Love being nothing more than functional. And whilst this isn't a good concert by any stretch of the imagination, it isn't a disaster either, and on the night, being there in person may not have been a totally disappointing experience. At least for audience members who may not have seen Elvis in person before.

There's also three bonus tracks -- a rough sounding Alright, Okay, You Win, from September 29th in Detroit, which is good to have at least. Whilst Elvis seems determined to ruin some of his own performances at this time as he does just this with a rendition of Trying to Get go You in College Park, which follows a banal run through of Blue Christmas from the same show.

With regards to what the release actually represents, I think it was worthwhile at the time in respect to FTD offering what was a hitherto unreleased soundboard recording, although everything they released wasn't going to be gold. Not then. Not now. Especially when Elvis could be so unpredictable during certain tours.

With this release, I think anybody that owned or had heard other concerts from this tour had some idea what to expect. Twenty years later, it's but one of many unremarkable concerts that has been released by FTD and import labels alike, however, it was something new on the table from a label that's still going all these years later. But it might be 20 years before I listen to it again.

Image
Tremendously interesting post. I haven't played this show since it first came out and rarely visit this tour for the reasons you describe so well in your review.

As an aside, I notice a few non-Elvis CDs that we both own. Love that Ray Charles Atlantic box.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by londonflash »

Hawaii '61 and discs one and two of the Las Vegas '71 FTD have all been played in the last couple of days.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by Greystoke »

londonflash wrote:
Sat Mar 11, 2023 7:52 pm
Greystoke wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2023 10:24 pm
After listening to Madison's Breathing Out Fire CD last week, I thought it was a good time to stay on the same tour and listen to another concert from this problematic period, and my choice was FTD's Dragonheart release. The concert itself is from five days earlier on October 1st, 1974, in South Bend, Indiana. Where Elvis was also under par and sounding high as a kite, but he was clearly alert and humorous, although there are moments where signs of irritation are on display as he soon tells the audience not to shout out any songs. Which Elvis tries to mask with some humour, but there's some professionalism and charm amiss here.

C.C. Rider is the customary opening number, and it's pretty flat, as is a lifeless I Got a Woman, during which Elvis makes a quip about Tom Jones, as he bumps and grinds. Comments about twenty years going down the drain and binoculars looking like frogs are familiar, although he also asks how much the building holds, and is informed that it's twelve-and-a-half thousand. A quick check reveals that 12,301 were in attendance on this night and the following night in the same arena, Notre Dame's Athletic & Convention Center.

The crowd is ecstatic, although Elvis could sing his next song, Love Me, in his sleep, whilst Blue Suede Shoes is feeble. Elvis also sounds quite impatient again when he interacts with the audience, commenting that he was raised in the Assembly of God Church, where "people shout," before audibly relishing in a performance of It's Midnight.

Big Boss Man follows and is no better than adequate, with Elvis goofing around quite a bit, although James Burton's guitar is very clear and he puts in some appealing licks. The crowd interaction continues before Fever, which Elvis and the audience seem to be having fun with, whilst Love Me Tender is little more than routine, although he does ask what age a young fan is, before commenting that his little girl is six years-old.

The messing around continues into Hound Dog, which Elvis starts with a growl, and he follows this with Heartbreak Hotel, which starts aggressively and with some swagger, but ends up messy.

There's more growling and snarling in If You Love Me (Let Me Know), although the piano lines are very clear here and nice to pick up on. Similarly, the brass, drums, and piano are also easy to single out during Bridge Over Troubled Water, which is marred by ad-libbing, vocalising, and general heavy-handedness on Elvis's part. Although he does say that he wants to do a good version.

Elvis still sounds quite irritated as he introduces his band members, making comment beforehand about a speaker blowing during Bridge Over Troubled Water, then getting annoyed again when it crackles as he speaks. This said, he does run with Lawdy Miss Clawdy, which Glen Hardin plays during his introduction, and it's a fun version that has some swing to it.

All Shook Up and Teddy Bear are little more than run-of-the-mill, but Elvis is playful on Don't Be Cruel, and tries to enliven the song in parts, although this is a song that needed due care and attention to work better in concert.

Conversely, Elvis gives more to Let Me Be There than he does his own hits, and whilst the obligatory reprise is a bit rough, this is an unremarkable performance of a song that could be fun in Elvis's hands. But not on this night.

It's Now Or Never follows and Elvis messes up the lyrics at the start, but I like the tempo here, and Elvis is trying to sing softly, but a compulsion to vocalise spoils the better aspects of this rendition. Which is somewhat of a double-edged sword, because Elvis sounds like he's trying, he just doesn't have the vocal capabilities to make these songs work in the absence of better singing and greater control of artistry, and instead is reaching for any port in a storm.

The same applies to You Gave Me a Mountain, where Elvis speaks, shouts, and undoubtedly tries to dig deep into the lyrics of a song that surely resonated with him. But this isn't a good version. Whilst the desire or desperation to get loud continues with Johnny B. Goode, after which Elvis talks about the Band-Aids on his hands, his rings, and Aloha from Hawaii. Which leads to a serviceable version of Hawaiian Wedding Song.

At this point, Elvis bows to a request and sings Steamroller Blues in fairly rudimentary fashion, then brings the show to a close with Can't Help Falling in Love being nothing more than functional. And whilst this isn't a good concert by any stretch of the imagination, it isn't a disaster either, and on the night, being there in person may not have been a totally disappointing experience. At least for audience members who may not have seen Elvis in person before.

There's also three bonus tracks -- a rough sounding Alright, Okay, You Win, from September 29th in Detroit, which is good to have at least. Whilst Elvis seems determined to ruin some of his own performances at this time as he does just this with a rendition of Trying to Get go You in College Park, which follows a banal run through of Blue Christmas from the same show.

With regards to what the release actually represents, I think it was worthwhile at the time in respect to FTD offering what was a hitherto unreleased soundboard recording, although everything they released wasn't going to be gold. Not then. Not now. Especially when Elvis could be so unpredictable during certain tours.

With this release, I think anybody that owned or had heard other concerts from this tour had some idea what to expect. Twenty years later, it's but one of many unremarkable concerts that has been released by FTD and import labels alike, however, it was something new on the table from a label that's still going all these years later. But it might be 20 years before I listen to it again.

Image
Tremendously interesting post. I haven't played this show since it first came out and rarely visit this tour for the reasons you describe so well in your review.

As an aside, I notice a few non-Elvis CDs that we both own. Love that Ray Charles Atlantic box.
There's certainly numerous soundboards that I haven't listened to in a very long time, both FTD and bootlegs. And I think it's about time for me to dip into a few again.

The Ray Charles Atlantic box really is excellent. Definitely one of my all-time favourite box sets.



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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by londonflash »

Greystoke wrote:
Sat Mar 11, 2023 9:26 pm
londonflash wrote:
Sat Mar 11, 2023 7:52 pm
Greystoke wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2023 10:24 pm
After listening to Madison's Breathing Out Fire CD last week, I thought it was a good time to stay on the same tour and listen to another concert from this problematic period, and my choice was FTD's Dragonheart release. The concert itself is from five days earlier on October 1st, 1974, in South Bend, Indiana. Where Elvis was also under par and sounding high as a kite, but he was clearly alert and humorous, although there are moments where signs of irritation are on display as he soon tells the audience not to shout out any songs. Which Elvis tries to mask with some humour, but there's some professionalism and charm amiss here.

C.C. Rider is the customary opening number, and it's pretty flat, as is a lifeless I Got a Woman, during which Elvis makes a quip about Tom Jones, as he bumps and grinds. Comments about twenty years going down the drain and binoculars looking like frogs are familiar, although he also asks how much the building holds, and is informed that it's twelve-and-a-half thousand. A quick check reveals that 12,301 were in attendance on this night and the following night in the same arena, Notre Dame's Athletic & Convention Center.

The crowd is ecstatic, although Elvis could sing his next song, Love Me, in his sleep, whilst Blue Suede Shoes is feeble. Elvis also sounds quite impatient again when he interacts with the audience, commenting that he was raised in the Assembly of God Church, where "people shout," before audibly relishing in a performance of It's Midnight.

Big Boss Man follows and is no better than adequate, with Elvis goofing around quite a bit, although James Burton's guitar is very clear and he puts in some appealing licks. The crowd interaction continues before Fever, which Elvis and the audience seem to be having fun with, whilst Love Me Tender is little more than routine, although he does ask what age a young fan is, before commenting that his little girl is six years-old.

The messing around continues into Hound Dog, which Elvis starts with a growl, and he follows this with Heartbreak Hotel, which starts aggressively and with some swagger, but ends up messy.

There's more growling and snarling in If You Love Me (Let Me Know), although the piano lines are very clear here and nice to pick up on. Similarly, the brass, drums, and piano are also easy to single out during Bridge Over Troubled Water, which is marred by ad-libbing, vocalising, and general heavy-handedness on Elvis's part. Although he does say that he wants to do a good version.

Elvis still sounds quite irritated as he introduces his band members, making comment beforehand about a speaker blowing during Bridge Over Troubled Water, then getting annoyed again when it crackles as he speaks. This said, he does run with Lawdy Miss Clawdy, which Glen Hardin plays during his introduction, and it's a fun version that has some swing to it.

All Shook Up and Teddy Bear are little more than run-of-the-mill, but Elvis is playful on Don't Be Cruel, and tries to enliven the song in parts, although this is a song that needed due care and attention to work better in concert.

Conversely, Elvis gives more to Let Me Be There than he does his own hits, and whilst the obligatory reprise is a bit rough, this is an unremarkable performance of a song that could be fun in Elvis's hands. But not on this night.

It's Now Or Never follows and Elvis messes up the lyrics at the start, but I like the tempo here, and Elvis is trying to sing softly, but a compulsion to vocalise spoils the better aspects of this rendition. Which is somewhat of a double-edged sword, because Elvis sounds like he's trying, he just doesn't have the vocal capabilities to make these songs work in the absence of better singing and greater control of artistry, and instead is reaching for any port in a storm.

The same applies to You Gave Me a Mountain, where Elvis speaks, shouts, and undoubtedly tries to dig deep into the lyrics of a song that surely resonated with him. But this isn't a good version. Whilst the desire or desperation to get loud continues with Johnny B. Goode, after which Elvis talks about the Band-Aids on his hands, his rings, and Aloha from Hawaii. Which leads to a serviceable version of Hawaiian Wedding Song.

At this point, Elvis bows to a request and sings Steamroller Blues in fairly rudimentary fashion, then brings the show to a close with Can't Help Falling in Love being nothing more than functional. And whilst this isn't a good concert by any stretch of the imagination, it isn't a disaster either, and on the night, being there in person may not have been a totally disappointing experience. At least for audience members who may not have seen Elvis in person before.

There's also three bonus tracks -- a rough sounding Alright, Okay, You Win, from September 29th in Detroit, which is good to have at least. Whilst Elvis seems determined to ruin some of his own performances at this time as he does just this with a rendition of Trying to Get go You in College Park, which follows a banal run through of Blue Christmas from the same show.

With regards to what the release actually represents, I think it was worthwhile at the time in respect to FTD offering what was a hitherto unreleased soundboard recording, although everything they released wasn't going to be gold. Not then. Not now. Especially when Elvis could be so unpredictable during certain tours.

With this release, I think anybody that owned or had heard other concerts from this tour had some idea what to expect. Twenty years later, it's but one of many unremarkable concerts that has been released by FTD and import labels alike, however, it was something new on the table from a label that's still going all these years later. But it might be 20 years before I listen to it again.

Image
Tremendously interesting post. I haven't played this show since it first came out and rarely visit this tour for the reasons you describe so well in your review.

As an aside, I notice a few non-Elvis CDs that we both own. Love that Ray Charles Atlantic box.
There's certainly numerous soundboards that I haven't listened to in a very long time, both FTD and bootlegs. And I think it's about time for me to dip into a few again.

The Ray Charles Atlantic box really is excellent. Definitely one of my all-time favourite box sets.
Yes, I've probably listened to more concerts already this year than I have in the previous two, although I'm still to venture past March 74.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by londonflash »

19/8/70 DS. Don't normally listen to audience recordings but bought this Double Dynamite release years ago on the understanding it's a good one.

Playing it through for the first time whilst enjoying a lager and watching the Champions League (there are worse ways to spend a Tuesday evening). Good quality, very good actually. Easy to make out Elvis' dialogue etc. Am aware there are some edits made to this performance so at first glance seems like a quick show, plus a fair amount of messing around (a sign of things to come). But all in good fun and very enjoyable.

No singing over the intro of The Wonder Of You either.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by joekro1977 »

With all this chatter about the Winter 1974 recordings I thought I'd revisit FTD's "48 Hours to Memphis" from March 18, 1974.

It's easy to overlook this show when the RLOSIM was clearly the better show - but Richmond is a lot of fun too (and this release sounds great.)

Glad I picked this one up when I had the chance. Been a long time since I've cranked up a show from '74.


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Re: Last Elvis Concert You Listened To Was?

Post by vinelvis »

joekro1977 wrote:
Mon Mar 20, 2023 5:52 pm
With all this chatter about the Winter 1974 recordings I thought I'd revisit FTD's "48 Hours to Memphis" from March 18, 1974.

It's easy to overlook this show when the RLOSIM was clearly the better show - but Richmond is a lot of fun too (and this release sounds great.)

Glad I picked this one up when I had the chance. Been a long time since I've cranked up a show from '74.
Every time I listen to it it surprises me how good the show was.