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AN AWESOME 8 MM find ... and in colour too !

The Beatles Melbourne Australia - 8mm Color

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The Beatles: Get Back: Release Date And Other Quick Things About The Peter Jackson Documentary

by Philip Sledge

Published: May. 22. 2021 3:04 PM


On January 30, 1969, the iconic rock and roll outfit The Beatles took to the roof of Apple Records headquarters in London, England, and gave passersby a one-of-a-kind experience when they performed what would be their final live performance. What is now known as The Beatles’ Rooftop Concert has gone down as one of the most iconic moments of 20th Century pop culture more than 50 years later. This concert, however, is just a small part of the Peter Jackson documentary The Beatles: Get Back, a soon-to-be-released intimate look at the final days of the seminal rock and roll band.

But while there are countless diehard Beatles fans who have spent the past few years diving through everything related to to Get Back, others might not be entirely caught up to speed on what sounds like one of the most important rock and roll documentaries since release of The Last Waltz or Gimme Shelter. Here are quick things to know about The Beatles: Get Back.

The Beatles: Get Back Release Date Is Set For August 27, 2021:


There is not all that much time between now and the release of The Beatles: Get Back as Peter Jackson’s documentary film is scheduled to land in theaters August 27, 2021 after nearly a yearlong delay. Jackson, who has been working on the project for a few years now, originally planned on releasing Get Back in September 2020, but when the COVID-19 pandemic caused a series of delays with the production, not to mention the closure of theaters around the world, the Lord of the Rings director and other major players elected to push things back, per Variety.

The Beatles: Get Back Follows The Fab Four During A Pivotal January 1969 Recording Session:


The Beatles: Get Back, which is being released by Walt Disney Studios, isn’t your standard rock and roll documentary and takes more of a “fly on the wall” approach to the way it documents the “Fab Four” — John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr — during a pivotal nearly monthlong January 1969 recording session, including the writing and rehearsing of 14 new songs, some of which would go on to be featured on the two final studios albums from the legendary rock and roll outfit: Abbey Road and Let It Be. These intimate sessions, featuring the recording of the final songs written by the songwriting powerhouse will shed new light on the band’s final days.

Director Peter Jackson Combed Through 60 Hours Of Unseen Footage And 150 Hours Of Unheard Audio For The Beatles: Get Back:

The footage featured throughout The Beatles: Get Back was compiled from 60 hours of never-before-scene footage that was captured by Michael Lindsay-Hogg who was sitting in with the band while putting together a documentary of his own, 1970’s Let It Be. According to Walt Disney Studios, this rare video footage (which has been restored) is combined with over 150 hours of unheard audio taking directly from the recording sessions, conversations, and that January 1969 rooftop concert which will be focal point of the upcoming film.


But while there are countless diehard Beatles fans who have spent the past few years diving through everything related to to Get Back, others might not be entirely caught up to speed on what sounds like
The Beatles: Get Back Release Date Is Set For August 27, 2021

There is not all that much time between now and the release of The Beatles: Get Back as Peter Jackson’s documentary film is scheduled to land in theaters August 27, 2021 after nearly a yearlong delay. Jackson, who has been working on the project for a few years now, originally planned on releasing Get Back in September 2020, but when the COVID-19 pandemic caused a series of delays with the production, not to mention the closure of theaters around the world, the Lord of the Rings director and other major players elected to push things back, per Variety.


The Beatles: Get Back Is The First Time The Iconic Rooftop Concert Has Been Shown In Its Entirety:


The Beatles’ historic January 30, 1969 concert has been featured in everything from the 1995 documentary series The Beatles Anthology to videos found on YouTube, but the upcoming Peter Jackson documentary will be the first time it has ever been shown in its entirety. According Disney, the concert, and the band’s decision to hold their first live performance since they stopped touring two years earlier, will be a major part of The Beatles: Get Back. High above London’s Savile Row, this landmark moment in rock and roll history will be shown like never before in brilliantly restored video and audio.

Peter Jackson Restored Footage For The Beatles: Get Back With The Same Technology He Used For They Shall Not Grow Old:


Those who have seen Peter Jackson’s 2018 World War I documentary They Shall Not Grow Old are all too familiar with the technology that was used to restore and bring new life to 100-year-old video footage of British soldiers during the Great War. That same technology, which digitized, refined, colored, and converted the old film stock to 4K quality is also refined, colored, and converted the old film stock to 4K quality is also being used by Jackson and the team at Park Road Post, per Collider. Early footage that has been shown almost looks as if it was captured on high-definition cameras in the 21st Century opposed to January 1969.


Peter Jackson Has Said The Beatles: Get Back Changes The Narrative Of The Band’s Final Days:

For decades now, the story has gone that the final days of The Beatles’ existence were filled with drama, in-fighting, and a breakdown of communication. And while some of that may very well be true, Peter Jackson has said The Beatles: Get Back shows a different side of the band and its four members, as he explained in a statement upon the documentary’s reveal (via NPR):


"I was relieved to discover the reality is very different to the myth. After reviewing all the footage and audio that Michael Lindsay-Hogg shot 18 months before they broke up, it's simply an amazing historical treasure-trove. Sure, there's moments of drama — but none of the discord this project has long been associated with. Watching John, Paul, George, and Ringo work together, creating now-classic songs from scratch, is not only fascinating — it's funny, uplifting and surprisingly intimate."



https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2567668/the-beatles-get-back-release-date-and-other-quick-things-about-the-peter-jackson-documentary
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The BEATLES in Communist Czechoslovakia by Parlogram Auctions

In this video, Parlogram Auctions talks of the fascinating story of the Beatles & western pop music behind the iron curtain in the 1960's and find out how it finally came in from the cold. S českými titulky.

0:00 - Opening sequence
1:23 - Availability of pop music in Czechoslovakia
1:57 - Czech history and my part in it
2:47 - Vinyl hunting in Prague
3:47 - Why Beatles music was banned
4:09 - Beatles songs but not sung by The Beatles
5:23 - Touring Czechoslovakia in the 1960's
5:42 - Manfred Mann in Prague
6:37 - The Prague Spring of 1968
7:11 - 'Normalization'
7:37 - 1st official Czech Beatles album release
8:24 - The Beach Boys concert in Prague 1969
9:17 - 1972: more western pop records released
9:38 - The release of the 'Abbey Road' LP
10:30 - First official Beatles single release
10:50 - 'Yesterday'/'I Should Have Know Better' 45 (1976)
11:05 - '62-65' compilation album (1981)
11:40 - Slovakia releases Hamburg Recordings
11:49 - 'Expedice R&R' compilation album (1983)
12:32 - 'A Hard Day's Night' & 'With The Beatles' releases.
12:53 - The 1989 'Velvet Revolution' and Prague today.
13:45 - Outro


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tempo 194 constant midi timing Version 2020
"I'll Cry Instead"

Written by: John Lennon / Paul McCartney

Song Written: April 1964
Song Recorded: June 1, 1964
First US Release Date: June 26, 1964
First US Album Release: United Artists #UAS 6366 "A Hard Day's Night" Soundtrack
US Single Release: Capitol #5234
Highest Chart Position: #25
British Album Release: Parlophone #PCS 3058 "A Hard Day's Night"
Length: 2:09 (U.S. mono version) 1:49 (stereo version)
Key: G major
Producer: George Martin
Engineers: Norman Smith, Ken Scott
Instrumentation (most likely):

John Lennon - Lead Vocals, Rhythm Guitar (1962 Gibson J160E)
George Harrison - Lead Guitar (1963 Gretsch 6122 Country Gentleman)
Paul McCartney - Bass Guitar (1963 Hofner 500/1)
Ringo Starr - Drums (1964 Ludwig Super Classic Black Oyster Pearl), Tambourine
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Very nicely done audio and video. But you have to know about and to understand chord's progression to fully appreciate video's like this.

Hey Bulldog Beatles drum and bass deconstructing lyrics chords
-

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AMR Acquires ‘The Beatles and India’ rights.

Abacus Media Rights picked up the distribution rights to The Beatles and India.

Produced by Renoir Pictures, a Silva Screen company, the feature documentary depicts the enduring love affair between The Beatles and India. Inspired by Ajoy Bose’s book Across the Universe, the film tells the band’s fascinating journey to a remote Himalayan ashram, exploring how India shaped the band. The film includes rare archival footage, unseen recordings and photographs, and eyewitness accounts.

Jonathan Ford, managing director at AMR, commented, “So much has been told about the most famous band in the world over the years but this is a real find. It is an extraordinary telling of a largely unknown series of events which had a massive impact on the Beatles’ future lives. Offering a wide range of interviews with people who met the group on their trips to India, most with their stories unheard. From journalists to musicians to teenage girls, each has a unique tale to share.”

https://www.videoageinternational.net/2021/06/02/news/amr-acquires-the-beatles-and-india/
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The Beatles Collection 13 Box Set (1978) - UK & German Comparisons

In this video, Parlogram Auctions is comparing the UK and German 'BC13' analogue stereo box sets (first released 1978) album-by-album to find out which one sounds the best.



0:00 - Introduction
0:32 - Titles
0:46 - Box set backstory
1:42 - Cover differences
2:12 - German label changes
2:38 - Inner-sleeve & box differences
3:04 - Stereo in Germany
4:00 - The contenders line up
4:33 - DMM Cutting
6:02 - Introducing the test sets
6:35 - Sound Quality testing begins
6:41 - Please, Please Me
8:38 - With The Beatles
9:50 - A Hard Days Night
10:37 - Beatles For Sale
11:35 - Help!
12:02 - Rubber Soul
12:54 - Revolver
13:58 - Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
14:52 - The White Album
16:06 - Yellow Submarine
16:49 - Abbey Road
17:33 - Let It Be
18:00 - Rarities
18:43 - Final Score
19:09 - Outro & thanks for watching!
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1971 - an awesome year of music and films !
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Original 1970 "Let it Be" -
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Ringo Starr criticises 1970 Beatles documentary ‘Let It Be’ for being “too miserable”

"I said, 'There was lots of laughter, I was there, we were laughing, we were having fun'"

Ringo Starr has criticised the original 1970 Beatles documentary Let It Be for being “too miserable”.

Director Michael Lindsay-Hogg oversaw the film which documented the band during recording sessions for their 12th studio album and drew particular attention to heated exchanges between Paul McCartney and George Harrison.

Speaking at a Zoom Q&A session this evening (March 18) for his new EP ‘Zoom In’, Starr said he was delighted that the Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson took over 56 hours of footage from that era and made it into the forthcoming The Beatles: Get Back documentary.

“I didn’t feel any joy in the original documentary, it was all focused on one moment which went down between two of the lads [McCartney and Harrison],” said Starr. “The rooftop concert [unannounced Beatles gig from the Apple Corps rooftop in 1969] was also only about seven to eight minutes long. With Peter’s [documentary] it’s 43 minutes long [laughs]. It’s about the music and a lot of joy.”

He continued: “I had several talks with Peter about how I felt. I thought it was miserable. I said, ‘There was lots of laughter, I was there, we were laughing, we were having fun. We were playing and doing what we do’.

“So Peter kept coming into LA with his iPad and he’d show me sections. He said, ‘Look what I’ve found here’ and he showed us laughing and having fun as a band. There was a lot of joy in making those records, those tracks so I’m certainly looking forward to seeing the whole thing. Even if you saw that little trailer that came out late last year, it’s full of fun.”

The Beatles: Get Back is due for release on August 27, after the original release date was moved due to the coronavirus pandemic.

https://www.nme.com/en_au/news/music/ringo-starr-criticises-1970-beatles-documentary-let-it-be-for-being-too-miserable-2903758
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quote:... "drew particular attention to heated exchanges between Paul McCartney and George Harrison."

Over the years, this has been blown out of proportion. In fact you have to wonder why Lindsay-Hogg included that scene at all in the 1970 original? Those Twickenhem rehearsals that you see in the opening 25-30 minutes are dark , poorly filmed and certainly left a lot to be desired.

Michael Lindsay-Hogg has spoken out on the difficulties and task he had to endure when putting the film together , i think it was just over a year ago. Will try and find and post it here. Interesting stuff.
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This is it. Director Michael Lindsay-Hogg interview. Was printed on the Ultimate Rock website a year ago.


On May 13, 1970, fans got their final look at the Beatles as one cohesive unit when the documentary Let It Be was released. Unveiled roughly a month after the band had broken up - and a week after the album of the same name was released - many expected the movie to be a kind of Beatles wake, capturing the final, tumultuous days of the biggest band on Earth. While some moments of turmoil did make the final cut, the majority of Let It Be highlighted the group’s creative process.

Using the cinema verite style of filmmaking - also referred to as a fly-on-the-wall technique - director Michael Lindsay-Hogg gave viewers an inside look at the Beatles hard at work. There's no narration pushing the story, with only a few titles explaining what's unfolding onscreen. Instead, Lindsay-Hogg chose to let the band’s songs and conversations propel the film forward.

Let It Be is structured into three segments. The first shows the band rehearsing at Twickenham studio, the second displays their recording at Apple headquarters and the third is their now-famous rooftop performance.

Many of the scenes at Twickenham seem jubilant, far from the “hell” that John Lennon and Paul McCartney would later describe. The band fools around on the sound stage, jamming on early versions of “Two of Us” and “I’ve Got a Feeling.” At one point, McCartney is seen discussing the song “One After 909,” stating that the band had avoided recording the tune because it “always hated the words.” Later, Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono, are shown waltzing to “I Me Mine.”


Still, arguably the most notable moment of the movie’s first act is a confrontation between McCartney and George Harrison. “I’m trying to help you, but all I hear is myself annoying you,” McCartney is heard saying. In response, the so-called Quiet Beatle speaks up: "I'll play whatever you want me to play, or I won't play at all if you don't want me to play. Whatever it is that will please you, I'll do it."

“I was aware that they were beginning to get on each other’s nerves,” Lindsay-Hogg later admitted in a conversation with Entertainment Weekly. The director sensed the tension building and positioned his cameras so the drama could unfold naturally. “I didn’t want them to feel the cameras were intrusive. I put one camera up in the gantry shooting down, so they didn’t see it. I moved the other camera back to the end of the studio. So they didn’t really know the cameras were there, which gave them the opportunity to get it off their chest.”

As Let It Be moved to Apple Studio for recording sessions, its tone becomes more serious. The band buckles down and focuses on hammering out new songs. Moments include Harrison and Ringo Starr working on “Octopus's Garden,” a bossa nova interpretation of “The Long and Winding Road” and a full run-through of “Let It Be.”

At one point, McCartney has a sidebar with Lennon to discuss Harrison’s resistance to performances. “He says ‘no films,’” McCartney explains. “But it’s wrong that. Very wrong that. Because you don’t know. What he means is no Help!, no Hard Day’s Night. And I agree. But no films? Cos this is a film, and now he doesn’t mind this.” McCartney goes on to note Harrison’s refusal to play TV shows or even get in front of a live audience. Lennon stares and smokes a cigarette while his bandmate complains.

“That was a tough one to keep in,” Lindsay-Hogg later admitted, revealing that the Beatles had initially pressured him to cut the conversation. The director described the scene as McCartney “yammering on, and John looks like he’s about to die from boredom.”

While the first two sections of the movie gives viewers unprecedented access inside the Beatles’ world, the lasting image of Let It Be remains the band’s iconic rooftop performance. The surprise concert wasn't initially planned, but came about after things evolved.

“Originally, the project was going be a television special, and the documentary footage was going to be used to support the television special,” Lindsay-Hogg explained. “Then, when we realized we weren’t going to do the television special, I had this idea to at least aim somewhere, and to try to do some kind of concert.”

The band discussed various venues - including London clubs, an amphitheater in Greece or even on a boat.

“We’d been looking for an end to the film, and it was a case of ‘How are we going to finish this in two weeks’ time?’” McCartney recalled in The Beatles Anthology. “So, it was suggested that we go up on the roof and do a concert there.” “I remember it was cold and windy and damp,” added Starr, “but all the people looking out from offices were really enjoying it.”

Indeed, part of what makes the concert segment so enjoyable are the reactions of unsuspecting passersby. When the Beatles perform their opening rendition of “Get Back,” a handful of locals are shown on the streets below, glancing upward and pointing. As the band continues its set - delivering renditions of “Don’t Let Me Down,” “I’ve Got a Feeling” and “Dig a Pony” - more and more curious onlookers begin to fill the streets. Fans climb atop neighboring buildings, hoping to get an even better view of the once-in-a-lifetime performance.


Read More: 50 Years Ago: 'Let It Be' Movie Captures the Beatles' Final Days | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/beatles-let-it-be-film/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral
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Live at Sam Houston Coliseum, Sam Houston, 19 August 1965 (Afternoon Show) -


Album: The Ultimate Live Collection Vol.15

01. Introducing 0:00
02. Twist And Shout 3:13
03. She's A Woman 4:35
04. I Feel Fine 7:28
05. Dizzy Miss Lizzy 10:15
06. Ticket To Ride 13:44
07. Evrerybody's Trying To Be My Baby 16:30
08. Can't Buy Me Love 19:36
09. Baby's In Black 22:13
10. I Wanna Be Your Man 24:50
11. A Hard Day's Night 28:00
12. Help 31:26
13. I´m Down 34:45

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New Musical Express 1966 Awards

Now some bright spark has been able to put together a colorized production of this. Came up good i reckon.
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:lol: I guess back then the U.S. was still dirty on the fab four following their august, 1966 american tour, AYE.

Teenagers reacting to The Beatles on American Bandstand (March 1967)


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Houston's City Auditorium, Sam Houston Coliseum and Music Hall-





The Beatles - Live: Sam Houston Coliseum (Aug. 19, 1965 - Evening Concert) [1965]

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This is another online review on the soon-to-be released "Get Back".

July/August 2021
The Beatles: Get Back—An Exclusive Deep Dive Into Peter Jackson’s Revelatory New Movie -

This fall Disney+ unveils the three-part documentary, which mines long-lost footage for a portrait of the band’s final chapter that’s so unexpected it surprised even Paul McCartney.

By Joe Hagan
June 17, 2021

Clockwise from top left John Lennon mugging for the camera Paul McCartney Ringo Starr studio high jinks George Harrison...
Clockwise from top left: John Lennon mugging for the camera; Paul McCartney; Ringo Starr; studio high jinks; George Harrison; producer George Martin welcoming keyboardist Billy Preston.THE BEATLES: GET BACK. COURTESY OF APPLE CORPS LTD.

Paul appears first, scanning the horizon as a gust of London wind tousles his dark hair. Then Ringo, in a red vinyl coat, ducking below scaffolding to examine his drum kit, cigarette dangling from his mouth. George—in black fur coat and lime green pants—straps on a Telecaster as John arrives to take in the weird scene through gold-framed spectacles: amplifiers and mics, movie cameras and crewmen scurrying around the rooftop of a five-story building on a cold gray day. John rubs his hands to warm them as a young film director puffs a cigar and shares a word with Paul. Billy Preston tests his keyboard and George fingers a familiar R&B riff. Yoko Ono, dressed entirely in black, looks on. An expectant bustle, a clapper board snaps, and then it happens: “1, 2, 3, 4…”

In split screen we see crowds gather on adjoining rooftops, like chimney sweeps from Oliver Twist. On the streets below, suited businessmen and young office workers crane their necks to the sky. “Where’s the noise coming from?” asks an onlooker.

Get back, Jojo!

It’s the Beatles as none would ever see or hear them again—their last live performance as a group, January 30, 1969. It’s also the Beatles as none of us, 52 years on, has ever seen them. The approximately 43-minute sequence from director Peter Jackson’s forthcoming documentary, The Beatles: Get Back—screened exclusively for Vanity Fair—shows the full, uninterrupted concert on the roof of 3 Savile Row, the band’s headquarters, including iconic performances that would appear on their last album, Let It Be. The original footage, taken from at least nine different cameras, has been scrubbed to astonishing clarity, detail, and color, a rapturous window in time. The doc will run on Disney+ over three nights on November 25, 26, and 27.

For a Beatles fan, this is manna from heaven, every detail taking on immense power: Paul’s brown shoe tapping in rhythm to George’s guitar; John flubbing a line, George smiling at the farkup, Paul peering over to make sure John picks up the slack; an assistant crouching to hold a clipboard of newly written lyrics for “Dig a Pony” so John can remember them; car horns blowing on the streets as John belts out “Danny Boy” between songs; the beauty of Ringo’s observant eyes behind the kit and George’s Mona Lisa smile as nerves settle and the band soars behind John in the transcendent
chorus of “Don’t Let Me Down.” We witness John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr lock together as a band, in real time, and the alchemical mix of tough and tender—McCartney helming his Höfner bass like a bearded sea captain, Lennon’s vulnerable smile peeking through long hair—is freshly shocking. Movingly, none appear more surprised by the magic of the Beatles than the band themselves.

“We went to London and screened that to Apple,” says Jackson, referring to the company founded by the Beatles in 1968, which still manages their legacy. “And they were excited. Then Paul saw it, and Ringo saw it. And then the whole emphasis at that point became, ‘Let’s have the entire concert in the film. Let’s just show the whole thing.’ ”

The whole thing—including a comic subplot involving a baffled 19-year-old policeman responding to noise complaints and getting a sly runaround from Apple staffers—forms the climax of Jackson’s documentary, a 21-day diary of the Beatles in their intimate creative world. Drawn from nearly 60 hours of archival footage, it depicts the band jamming, writing, arranging, clowning, sparring, riffing, struggling, and finally succeeding to make Let It Be.

All this footage was originally shot for Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s vérité film Let It Be, which included a roughly 22-minute version of the rooftop concert but became known, by the few who saw it, for very
different reasons. The movie premiered in May 1970, a month after the Beatles broke up, and was largely regarded as depressing evidence of the band’s dissolution—before promptly going out of circulation. In black-market versions, the original 16-millimeter film, converted to 35-millimeter for the big screen, looked somber, saturated in blues and greens. A Beatles fanatic since the 1970s—he was eight when they broke up—Jackson himself owned a fourth-generation bootleg on VHS, the muddy quality confirming his grim view of the period. Indeed, the director was the first skeptic of Apple’s project to disinter the footage. “I actually didn’t say yes,” recalls the three-time Oscar-winning director of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. “I said, ‘Can I look at all the footage first? And then I’ll let you know.’ Because I was thinking, I’d love to make a Beatles film, but I don’t want to make the Beatles-breakup film. That’s the one Beatles movie I would never want to make.”

And so after first meeting with Apple, Jackson returned to his home in New Zealand with the unedited footage from the movie (the “rushes,” in filmmaking argot), and sat down to see for himself. “I was waiting for it to go bad,” he says, “and I had a kind of heavy heart.”

As he watched, says Jackson, history shifted: “What I found is that I was laughing continuously. I just was laughing. I was laughing and laughing and laughing, and I didn’t stop.”

When Jackson went backstage at a Paul McCartney concert in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2017, he was surprised to find McCartney nervous to meet him, concerned with what Jackson had found in the footage. “I could see on his face he was imagining the worst,” says the director. “I just said to him, ‘Look, I’ve got to say, it surprised the hell out of me because I was expecting it to be a miserable experience for you. I expected to have to witness a rather bleak moment—but it’s actually the exact opposite. It’s incredibly funny. It’s incredibly lively. It shows you guys having a great time.’

“And he couldn’t believe it,” says Jackson. “He said, ‘What? What? Really? Really?’ And it certainly surprised him. Because he has never seen this stuff, even though he lived through it. It’s a long time ago, and subsequent events, I think, just muddied the whole memory of this thing.”

Last year, when Disney released a teaser for Get Back—meant to assuage expectant fans after the project was delayed for a year because of COVID-19—the montage of never-seen footage showing Lennon gleefully horsing around the studio with McCartney (doing a comic version of “Two of Us” through clenched teeth), and Ono chatting warmly with McCartney’s wife, Linda Eastman, looked revelatory, astonishing, and a bit suspicious to fans with even a passing
knowledge of Beatles history. Was Jackson cherry-picking moments of levity to sell a revisionist history? A whitewash? “I don’t think they’ll feel that when they’ve seen it,” Jackson says, “but I understand where that’s coming from. This is not what you read in the books.”

The books, of course, have long been in accord: The Let It Be sessions were a miserable time for the Beatles, an inflection point for heir coming breakup as Ono became a wedge between Lennon and the band, and Harrison yearned to break free from the mop-top machine (even quitting the Beatles at one point). In the weeks after the recordings, Lennon recruited manager Allen Klein to take over the band’s business affairs, and McCartney hired his own father-in-law, attorney Lee Eastman, to counter Klein’s machinations, leading to a vicious legal battle that lasted long after the band dissolved. In the aftermath, Lennon savaged the Let It Be sessions, telling Rolling Stone, “They were writing about [Yoko] looking miserable in the Let It Be film, but you sit through 60 sessions with the most bigheaded, uptight people on earth and see what it’s farkin’ like, and be insulted just because you love someone.”

And so went the story until 48 years later, when Apple Corps CEO Jeff Jones and Apple executive Jonathan Clyde invited Jackson to their offices in London to discuss a traveling Beatles exhibition that would feature unrelated archival films. They asked Jackson whether he could update old footage using the same technology he used to revive vintage World War I reels for the acclaimed 2018 documentary They Shall Not Grow Old. When Jackson casually asked about the Let It Be movie, he was told that a separate project to make a new documentary from the rushes was in the works—but that the original director had just dropped out. At this, Jackson perked up. “So I just put up my hand and I said, ‘Well, if you’ve just lost a filmmaker, I’m sitting here, I’ll do it,’ ” he says.

The Beatles exhibition never happened, but after Jackson reviewed the Let It Be footage—twice—he realized he would be telling a much different story from the one most people understood. Unlike Ron Howard’s Eight Days a Week: The Touring Years, the 2016 documentary about the mid-’60s period before the Beatles, overwhelmed by fan mania, stopped playing live, Jackson’s film isn’t just a delicious peek at lost footage (though it is that). It’s an amendment to the received history.

Jackson is cognizant of the delicacy of a project in which he second-guesses another filmmaker’s creative decisions. He met with Lindsay-Hogg in Los Angeles in 2020 to show how his technology could transform the footage. “He showed me a comparison of my Let It Be’s footage and his stuff,” says Lindsay-Hogg, including how McCartney’s hair appeared as a single block of color in the original and “now you can see every single strand of hair.”

Lindsay-Hogg defends his own film as more “original” and “up” than people remember. He also says that Apple asked for his goodwill toward Jackson’s film, which he looks forward to seeing, and that he feels it’s Apple’s intention to possibly re-release Let It Be a few months after Jackson’s Get Back comes out. (Quentin Tarantino’s movie theater in Los Angeles, the New Beverly Cinema, has expressed an interest in screening Let It Be, if it is re-released, he says.)
As for Jackson, he’s developed a deeper admiration for the original, in part because of the circumstances under which Lindsay-Hogg labored, what with an increasingly acrimonious band hovering around him. “The Beatles that I’m dealing with now are Beatles that can’t remember January ’69,” Jackson says. “I mean, they literally can’t. Not really. And I don’t blame them.”


Seeing THE FOOTAGE from Get Back was a relief for McCartney because it countered his LINGERING GUILT over the breakup of the Beatles.



now read the following paragraph carefully, let the joy of the moment sink in slowly, as this is the best news of all :D


In a decisive and crucial creative act, Jackson says he avoided repeating footage from the original film. Even familiar scenes would use alternative camera angles. “One of our mantras is that Let It Be is one movie, and our movie is a different movie,” he says, “and we’re trying not to repeat any footage, with one or two tiny exceptions where we can’t do anything else. But we’re trying to not step on Let It Be’s toes so that it is still a film that has a reason to exist, and our movie will be a supplement to it.”

Fifty-one years after the group broke up, Jackson’s film is probably the last revelatory document we’re likely to see. That it also documents their last official album gives it a bittersweet power. Fans and scholars will likely debate whether Get Back is a revision of history or a correction. But it’s something everyone craves: more Beatles. Says Jackson: “Paul said to me at one stage, ‘Look, this stuff’s fantastic, because at the end of the day, I’m a Beatles fan.’”

https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2021/06/the-beatles-get-back-exclusive-deep-dive-peter-jacksons-movie
1971 - an awesome year of music and films !
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Re: The BEATLES Appreciation Topic...

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OK so in a nutshell, there isn't going to be some immersive two-hour theatrical release because of the pandemic. And no date has been announced regarding blu-ray/DVD product! The international deal with Disney, who has poured millions of $$$ for this and we know that they're wanting to get the money back through subscription and streaming services.

Well I can live without that, but I do wonder whether six hours of this era of January, 1969 might actually be too much?
Generally diehards can't get enough of the Beatles but I'm not so sure about the marketing strategy.
The idea of paying for, but never owning something is still a very foreign concept for over fifty, sixty-somethings.
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The mind boggles the uproar in the Elvis world should Sony-Warners-The Estate one night go into bed with eachother and cut a deal with Disney or some other streaming giant for a six-hour Elvis on Tour :lol:
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Sgt Pepper - The ULTIMATE Stereo Vinyl - AUDIOPHILE Edition


In this video, Parlogram Auctions takes 4 famous audiophile stereo vinyl pressings of this legendary album and find out which one sounds the best.


0:00 - In search of the 'Holy Grail' pressing
1:15 - Titles
1:41 - 1967 recording & release
2:53 - Mixing the stereo version
3:39 - My first Sgt. Pepper's LP
4:07 - The mastertapes in the early 1980's...
4:43 - MFSL get full access
5:13 - UHQR pressing is released
5:56 - MFSL 14 LP box set

6:17 - The missing side 2 lock-groove audio
6:37 - Australian 'Audio 5' Edition
7:22 - Nimbus company history
8:25 - Nimbus release Sgt Pepper
9:23 - Nimbus pressing details
10:41 - Sound quality comparison test begins
12:12 - Waveform overview of all pressings
12:36 - 1st pressing
13:22 - UHQR
14:22 - MFSL
14:47 - Nimbus
16:20 - The best sounding pressing is....
17:02 - Best value alternatives
17:22 - Outro
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Rain (Remastered Promo Outtakes) - Interesting compilation with two days of film included -



The next day The Beatles went to Chiswick House in London to film two more videos.

Today's outside shoot was all in colour and on film not video.

"Rain" was filmed next and a quite a bit of footage was shot which was all edited down into one version that was also screened on "Top of The Pops" albeit in black & white.
In November 1995 a re-edited "Rain" (incorporating footage from the previous days indoor filming) was shown during "The Beatles Anthology" TV specials.

In 2003 this promo was remastered and re-edited using previously unseen outtakes then distributed around the World to promote "The Beatles Anthology" DVD release.
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Another interesting outtakes comp.
The Beatles filmed a promotional film for their single "Strawberry Fields Forever".
It premiered on UK television on "Top of The Pops" on February 16 1967.
Colour outtakes from the filming have appeared on Youtube from "Revolver TV" and on DVD from various sources including "The Beatles Anthology" and "Imagine: John Lennon".



Title: Strawberry Fields Forever
Type: Promo Video
Filming Location: Knole Park, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
Filming Date: January 30th-31st 1967
Broadcast Date: February 16th 1967 (Top Of The Pops)
Country Of Broadcast: UK
Duration: 04:23 Minutes
Quality: A
Source: "Beatles 1+" (DVD & Blu Ray Non 6th 2015)
Other Sources:
Notes: The Beatles filmed a promotional film for their new single "Strawberry Fields Forever".
It premiered on UK television on "Top of The Pops" on February 16.

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Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream Skit . This excerpt was from their "Around The Beatles" TV Special, 1964. Only now it's colourized. Very nicely done.

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"Get Back" with Harrison and Lennon each singing lead. Not sure when or where, however.




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Makes for delightful instrumental when listening with ur headphones.


Wait (Isolated Bass and Drums Mix)



Run For Your Life (Drums, Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar 1)


1971 - an awesome year of music and films !