last movie you watched

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Re: last movie you watched

Post by MikeFromHolland »

.

Watched Pastor Hall (1940) by Roy Boulting (director) and his twin brother John Boulting (producer) as released by Indicator earlier this year. It was written by the German Jewish dramatist Ernst Toller (1893-1939) who was made ‘public enemy number one’ by Joseph Goebbels and his works were amongst those destroyed in the book burnings of 1933. He went into exile that same year and settled in the US. It’s there where he wrote the play Pastor Hall in 1938, just one year before his death by suicide (or was it set up that way?). It was one of the few anti-Nazi dramas to be translated into English before the war.

The film is losely based on the experiences of pastor Martin Niemöller (1892-1984) and (not mentioned but definitely the case) Toller’s own experiences. A very interesting movie considering the time it was filmed.

Martin Niemöller may still be known for this poem he wrote:

First they came for the Communists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a Communist

Then they came for the Socialists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a Socialist

Then they came for the trade unionists
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a trade unionist

Then they came for the Jews
And I did not speak out
Because I was not a Jew

Then they came for me
And there was no one left
To speak out for me






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Re: last movie you watched

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Went to the cinema this morning to watch the one time screening, in my neighborhood, of The Real Charlie Chaplin (2021), and it was time well spend. Actors acting out on recorded interviews worked very well. 1 hour and 55 minutes were too short. Too much was left out in my opinion.

Seeing outtakes of City Lights with the flower girl scene over and over again was a real treat. Seeing some scenes of The Kid on the big screen was very touching as well.

They are showing some restored Chaplin movies at the Eye Filmmuseum in Amsterdam this summer. This docu has convinced me to go and watch a few. Chaplin on the big screen is magic.



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Re: last movie you watched

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MikeFromHolland wrote:
Sat Jul 23, 2022 5:47 pm
.

Went to the cinema this morning to watch the one time screening, in my neighborhood, of The Real Charlie Chaplin (2021), and it was time well spend. Actors acting out on recorded interviews worked very well. 1 hour and 55 minutes were too short. Too much was left out in my opinion.

Seeing outtakes of City Lights with the flower girl scene over and over again was a real treat. Seeing some scenes of The Kid on the big screen was very touching as well.

They are showing some restored Chaplin movies at the Eye Filmmuseum in Amsterdam this summer. This docu has convinced me to go and watch a few. Chaplin on the big screen is magic.



.
The Kid is such a wonderful movie (especially in the later re-edit that Chaplin did). It still works well on the big screen, too. I know there's a Chaplin coming on re-release soon, but I don't remember what it is.

Last night, I followed up the 1973 version of Tom sawyer with the 1974 Huckleberry Finn. What a comedown. Despite having much of the same cast and the same songwriters, this is really quite awful - so awful that I began fast-forwarding through bits. I give it some credit for coming up with a better final section than the book (which isn't difficult, the ending of the book is a mess), but the pacing is all over the place here, and it's a very dull two hours.

Tonight, I watched The Black Sleep, a horror movie from 1956, featuring the final performance of Bela Lugosi in a small role, mute butler-type character. Also featured very briefly is John Carradine, and Lon Chaney Jr is also included in a wordless role. The film has a terrible reputation, but actually I rather enjoyed it. Straight horror movies were not all that common in the 1950s, having mostly given way to sci-fi variations on the theme. The real star of The Black Sleep is Basil Rathbone as a scientist who doesn't care about maiming and killing the people he operates on in his brain surgery experiments - shown in surprisingly graphic detail for a 1956 film. For me, this fits in rather well as a kind of link between the Universal and Val Lewton films of the 1940s and the Corman Poe films of the 1960s - occupying a similar position as House of Wax and The Mad Magician. I thought it was a solid movie, and far better than its reputation.


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Re: last movie you watched

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Tonight's movie was Duel at Silver Creek, a decent western starring Audie Murphy from 1952. This was Don Siegel's first western, and it's pretty straightforward in all regards, but works well nonetheless, and was clearly a kind of training exercise for Siegel given what was to follow.


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Re: last movie you watched

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Sometimes I see a vintage film that has been released on blu ray and wonder "why in hell did they choose that for the HD treatment?" A Strange Adventure from 1956 is one such film. Of all films Kino could choose to release, they come up with this rather dull crime movie, that relies on most of the characters being very slow on the uptake. On the plus side, it has handsome Ben Cooper in HD (something I never object to), but it also contains a performance from Nick Adams that is so poor he would easily have earned a Razzie if they existed in 1956. OK, it's a harmless film and just about holds the attention for 70 minutes, but I doubt anyone was jumping for joy when the blu ray for this one was announced.


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Re: last movie you watched

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pmp wrote:
Thu Jul 28, 2022 3:04 am
Sometimes I see a vintage film that has been released on blu ray and wonder "why in hell did they choose that for the HD treatment?" A Strange Adventure from 1956 is one such film. Of all films Kino could choose to release, they come up with this rather dull crime movie, that relies on most of the characters being very slow on the uptake. On the plus side, it has handsome Ben Cooper in HD (something I never object to), but it also contains a performance from Nick Adams that is so poor he would easily have earned a Razzie if they existed in 1956. OK, it's a harmless film and just about holds the attention for 70 minutes, but I doubt anyone was jumping for joy when the blu ray for this one was announced.
Holding the attention for 70 minutes may be the reason to choose for the HD treatment, who knows …


Watched Dead Reckoning (1947) this evening. A film noir with Humphrey Bogart and Lizabeth Scott ten years prior to working with Elvis. Though the story was a bit messy this one could hold my attention for the full 99 minutes, kinda enjoyed it. And I was surprised seeing Scott singing “Either it’s love or it isn’t” as written by Allan Roberts and Doris Fisher. A song I knew from The Inkspots.

According to IMDB she is lip syncing to Trudy Stevens who actually did the singing.




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Re: last movie you watched

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MikeFromHolland wrote:
Thu Jul 28, 2022 11:49 pm
pmp wrote:
Thu Jul 28, 2022 3:04 am
Sometimes I see a vintage film that has been released on blu ray and wonder "why in hell did they choose that for the HD treatment?" A Strange Adventure from 1956 is one such film. Of all films Kino could choose to release, they come up with this rather dull crime movie, that relies on most of the characters being very slow on the uptake. On the plus side, it has handsome Ben Cooper in HD (something I never object to), but it also contains a performance from Nick Adams that is so poor he would easily have earned a Razzie if they existed in 1956. OK, it's a harmless film and just about holds the attention for 70 minutes, but I doubt anyone was jumping for joy when the blu ray for this one was announced.
Holding the attention for 70 minutes may be the reason to choose for the HD treatment, who knows …


Watched Dead Reckoning (1947) this evening. A film noir with Humphrey Bogart and Lizabeth Scott ten years prior to working with Elvis. Though the story was a bit messy this one could hold my attention for the full 99 minutes, kinda enjoyed it. And I was surprised seeing Scott singing “Either it’s love or it isn’t” as written by Allan Roberts and Doris Fisher. A song I knew from The Inkspots.

According to IMDB she is lip syncing to Trudy Stevens who actually did the singing.




.
I don't think I've seen Dead Reckoning, but there sure was a lot of lip-syncing going on in those film noirs!


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Re: last movie you watched

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.

Watched Connecting Rooms (1970) from Franklin Gollings, with headliners Bette Davis and Michael Redgrave who both played very held back and realistic. I was pleasantly surprised. Studiocanal’s 4K restoration on the Indicator release I saw, is crystal clear, very beautiful.





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Re: last movie you watched

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Watched last night "Eloise's Lover" made in Spain.

It's for the most part, a good story line, but with a disappointing, weak end. It also has some nudity and one graphic lesbian sex scene.
But this film was far more than the sum of its X-rated parts.

On a scale of 1-10, i would give it 6.


spoiler alert...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elo%C3%AFse%27s_Lover


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Re: last movie you watched

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Walter Hale 4 wrote:
Mon Aug 01, 2022 2:41 am
Watched last night "Eloise's Lover" made in Spain.

It's for the most part, a good story line, but with a disappointing, weak end. It also has some nudity and one graphic lesbian sex scene.
But this film was far more than the sum of its X-rated parts.

On a scale of 1-10, i would give it 6.


spoiler alert...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elo%C3%AFse%27s_Lover

Good timing to view this film. It coincides with Pride in Amsterdam right now (July 30 - August 7), see: https://pride.amsterdam/en/

I considered the film being sweet and lovely.

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Re: last movie you watched

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.

Watched a surprisingly entertaining movie last night. I didn’t know what to expect, as with most of my Indicator buys, it was a blind buy. The film reminded me here and there of the epic and hard to beat “Fitzcarraldo” (1982) by Werner Herzog with Klaus Kinski, but this one was earlier:

“Murphy’s Law” (1971) by Peter Yates with a really fantastic role of Peter O’Toole as Murphy. Loved it.

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Re: last movie you watched

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.

Watched another Indicator release from earlier this year, a (very freely done) PD James adaptation: An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1982) by Christopher Petit. Someone I never heard of before. It has a bit of a Film Noir feeling to it. I don’t know the novel it’s based on, but I liked it as a movie, though there are some unlikely scenes in it.

Another review of this release:



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Re: last movie you watched

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MikeFromHolland wrote:
Wed Aug 03, 2022 10:37 pm
.

Watched another Indicator release from earlier this year, a (very freely done) PD James adaptation: An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1982) by Christopher Petit. Someone I never heard of before. It has a bit of a Film Noir feeling to it. I don’t know the novel it’s based on, but I liked it as a movie, though there are some unlikely scenes in it.

Another review of this release:



.
These were my thoughts on it:
Tonight I saw An Unsuitable Job for a Woman, released today on blu ray by Powerhouse/Indicator. This is an early 1980s film adaptation of a P D James book which is both interesting and disappointing. It works pretty well, but the problem is that it's difficult to translate James's rather dense and wordy books into a 90 minute feature film, especially the lead character is as complex as this one. There are many loose ends, and the whole thing comes across somewhat as a York Notes version. It's clearly made on a relatively low budget, and there are moments when that is very visible on screen. In a scene in a well, the harness holding the actor in place can clearly be seen. Meanwhile, the cameraman keeps popping up - in a mirror and in the reflection of a car window. One such mistake in a film is forgiveable, two is just a bit lazy. The blu ray comes with oodles of extras, which is nice, but I was left wondering somewhat as to why this movie rather than something better or more important was on blu ray in a nice shiny restoration.


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Re: last movie you watched

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My film tonight was Gallant Sons, from 1940. This is headed by Jackie Cooper and Bonita Granville as leaders of a group of teenagers who decide to try to clear the name of the father of one of their friends. It's pretty good, coming across as the kind of film that Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney might make if they were in a whodunnit!

Last night was Dr Cyclops from the same year, a technicolour film about a mad doctor who shrinks some of his fellow scientists. Completely mad, of course, but surely this influence The Incredible Shrinking Man (the costumes are very similar to what he wore) and the likes of Honey I Shrunk the Kids.

The night before that was a recent film called "1985" about a gay young man visiting his family for a last Christmas, knowing he's dying of AIDS. It's well-made in grainy black and white, but I confess I tend to struggle with films with these kinds of "illness" storylines.


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Re: last movie you watched

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pmp wrote:
Fri Aug 05, 2022 3:18 am
MikeFromHolland wrote:
Wed Aug 03, 2022 10:37 pm
.

Watched another Indicator release from earlier this year, a (very freely done) PD James adaptation: An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1982) by Christopher Petit. Someone I never heard of before. It has a bit of a Film Noir feeling to it. I don’t know the novel it’s based on, but I liked it as a movie, though there are some unlikely scenes in it.

Another review of this release:



.
These were my thoughts on it:
Tonight I saw An Unsuitable Job for a Woman, released today on blu ray by Powerhouse/Indicator. This is an early 1980s film adaptation of a P D James book which is both interesting and disappointing. It works pretty well, but the problem is that it's difficult to translate James's rather dense and wordy books into a 90 minute feature film, especially the lead character is as complex as this one. There are many loose ends, and the whole thing comes across somewhat as a York Notes version. It's clearly made on a relatively low budget, and there are moments when that is very visible on screen. In a scene in a well, the harness holding the actor in place can clearly be seen. Meanwhile, the cameraman keeps popping up - in a mirror and in the reflection of a car window. One such mistake in a film is forgiveable, two is just a bit lazy. The blu ray comes with oodles of extras, which is nice, but I was left wondering somewhat as to why this movie rather than something better or more important was on blu ray in a nice shiny restoration.
Well spotted mistakes you point at, I didn’t even notice them. :smt023

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Re: last movie you watched

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pmp wrote:
Fri Aug 05, 2022 3:25 am
My film tonight was Gallant Sons, from 1940. This is headed by Jackie Cooper and Bonita Granville as leaders of a group of teenagers who decide to try to clear the name of the father of one of their friends. It's pretty good, coming across as the kind of film that Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney might make if they were in a whodunnit!

Last night was Dr Cyclops from the same year, a technicolour film about a mad doctor who shrinks some of his fellow scientists. Completely mad, of course, but surely this influence The Incredible Shrinking Man (the costumes are very similar to what he wore) and the likes of Honey I Shrunk the Kids.

The night before that was a recent film called "1985" about a gay young man visiting his family for a last Christmas, knowing he's dying of AIDS. It's well-made in grainy black and white, but I confess I tend to struggle with films with these kinds of "illness" storylines.

Gallant Sons looks interesting. Have put it on my “to look for” list.

This evening I rewatched Fellini’s La Strada (1954), this time in a remastered version, and it still hasn’t lost any of its appeal imo. Besides an Oscar for best foreign movie it won a lot of other awards. Both Antony Quinn and Giuletta Masina play wonderfully, the story is rich and captivating. Even for a second time.



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Re: last movie you watched

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Tonight I saw "Them" which is out on blu-ray in an exclusive edition from HMV. Some of the effects in these 1950s sci-fi movies look a big laughable today, but what is most striking is just how intelligently written they are. Them, as with the likes of Invasion of the Body Snatchers or Quatermass, is not written as schlock horror to titillate audiences, but as thought-provoking fare drawing from fears and politics of the time. Unfortunately, the poster doesn't reflect this at all, meaning many are not interested in the movie from the outset. It's a really great piece of work, though, with some fine acting and a great script.


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Re: last movie you watched

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pmp wrote:Tonight I saw "Them" which is out on blu-ray in an exclusive edition from HMV. Some of the effects in these 1950s sci-fi movies look a big laughable today, but what is most striking is just how intelligently written they are. Them, as with the likes of Invasion of the Body Snatchers or Quatermass, is not written as schlock horror to titillate audiences, but as thought-provoking fare drawing from fears and politics of the time. Unfortunately, the poster doesn't reflect this at all, meaning many are not interested in the movie from the outset. It's a really great piece of work, though, with some fine acting and a great script.
Another well-written and highly influential sci-fi film, one of the first of the 1950’s cycle, The Thing From Another World (1951) - which I watched last night for the upteenth time, but on BluRay for the first time.



Remade in 1982 by John Carpenter with Kurt Russell this 1951 film is my favorite of the two (there’s also a 2011 “prequel/sequel/remake” (not really sure what it is)).

The 1951 film was the first of its kind, a alien invasion film, a battle against a threat in a lonely, isolated environment, military vs scientific ideals. It was also the first film to use a full-body burn of a stuntman in an exciting sequence that uses only the light from the fire to light the scene!

I’ve always loved the opening title card, those first 45 seconds scared the sh*t out of this 10 year-old when I first saw this in the mid-1970’s with my Dad on the Saturday late show on CBC here.



This film is often referred to as the one with the giant carrot from outer space, giving it a reputation it doesn’t deserve. It got that because of a description of the invader by a character in the film of exactly that. Meant as a joke, of course. The reality, the scientists discover that the Alien is made up of cells similar to that found in plants and vegetables on earth and can regenerate itself and seeds from its skin once in contact with the soil can grow more of the “Thing”!

Rapid-fire overlapping dialogue, fast paced, economical film making and genuine jolts the first time out. Seek out an HD copy and watch, watch the skies!


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Re: last movie you watched

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ForeverElvis wrote:
Sat Aug 06, 2022 11:24 pm
pmp wrote:Tonight I saw "Them" which is out on blu-ray in an exclusive edition from HMV. Some of the effects in these 1950s sci-fi movies look a big laughable today, but what is most striking is just how intelligently written they are. Them, as with the likes of Invasion of the Body Snatchers or Quatermass, is not written as schlock horror to titillate audiences, but as thought-provoking fare drawing from fears and politics of the time. Unfortunately, the poster doesn't reflect this at all, meaning many are not interested in the movie from the outset. It's a really great piece of work, though, with some fine acting and a great script.
Another well-written and highly influential sci-fi film, one of the first of the 1950’s cycle, The Thing From Another World (1951) - which I watched last night for the upteenth time, but on BluRay for the first time.



Remade in 1982 by John Carpenter with Kurt Russell this 1951 film is my favorite of the two (there’s also a 2011 “prequel/sequel/remake” (not really sure what it is)).

The 1951 film was the first of its kind, a alien invasion film, a battle against a threat in a lonely, isolated environment, military vs scientific ideals. It was also the first film to use a full-body burn of a stuntman in an exciting sequence that uses only the light from the fire to light the scene!

I’ve always loved the opening title card, those first 45 seconds scared the sh*t out of this 10 year-old when I first saw this in the mid-1970’s with my Dad on the Saturday late show on CBC here.



This film is often referred to as the one with the giant carrot from outer space, giving it a reputation it doesn’t deserve. It got that because of a description of the invader by a character in the film of exactly that. Meant as a joke, of course. The reality, the scientists discover that the Alien is made up of cells similar to that found in plants and vegetables on earth and can regenerate itself and seeds from its skin once in contact with the soil can grow more of the “Thing”!

Rapid-fire overlapping dialogue, fast paced, economical film making and genuine jolts the first time out. Seek out an HD copy and watch, watch the skies!
Very much so. Sadly, the titles themselves give the impression that they are going to be a bit crap - as do titles of the Val Lewton films a decade earlier. Who thought a film called I Walked with a Zombie would be masterpiece?

Tonight I watched The Return of Dracula, which comes from 1958, and is very much a B-movie. This was shown on Talking Pictures recently in the UK. It's surprisingly decent, and while it's not frightening particularly, it is interesting in that it has Dracula tricking his way into a close-knit family living in suburbia. This makes it different enough to make it interesting, and there are some decent performances and good black and white cinematography, even if the print broadcast was a bit on the dark side.


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Re: last movie you watched

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Tonight's film was an obscure 1981 supernatural drama called The Appointment. So obscure, in fact, that the only copy that the BFI could come up with for release was copy used for TV broadcast a couple of years after it was made. It's released on blu ray, but in SD! Edward Woodward stars as a businessman who has to tell his teenage daughter that he has to be away on business rather than attending a concert she is performing in. The film then goes off in a strange direction where strange dreams are had and strange things start happening. Is the daughter somehow controlling these events with her mind, or is it something else? Got to the end, and realised I still didn't know! Even so, though, this is a fascinating oddity where not much happens but you can't stop watching. I bought the blu ray and am still wondering at this point whether it's a keeper or one for ebay. Probably keep for now.


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Re: last movie you watched

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.

Watched the longer Director’s Cut from The Bullfighter And The Lady (1951) by Budd Boetticher. Not to be confused with Elvis’ The Bullfighter Was A Lady ofcourse.





Though this version was 124 minutes, I found it quite fascinating. Still don’t get the charm of bull fighting, but it was very well filmed and edited. Some scenes taken from a low perspective, with the sky in the background, even reminded me of Triumph Des Willens by Leni Riefenstahl. Just to make the bullfighters look more heroic I suppose. Boetticher himself was a bull fighter, so this film might have a bit propaganda in it for this ‘sport’.

Nice it was to see Katy Jurado in this one. We know her from Stay Away, Joe. What a beautiful lady and actress. The screen lighted up a bit, every time she appeared. Or was it me lighting up every time this happened?




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Re: last movie you watched

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MikeFromHolland wrote:
Tue Aug 09, 2022 7:07 pm
.

Watched the longer Director’s Cut from The Bullfighter And The Lady (1951) by Budd Boetticher. Not to be confused with Elvis’ The Bullfighter Was A Lady ofcourse.





Though this version was 124 minutes, I found it quite fascinating. Still don’t get the charm of bull fighting, but it was very well filmed and edited. Some scenes taken from a low perspective, with the sky in the background, even reminded me of Triumph Des Willens by Leni Riefenstahl. Just to make the bullfighters look more heroic I suppose. Boetticher himself was a bull fighter, so this film might have a bit propaganda in it for this ‘sport’.

Nice it was to see Katy Jurado in this one. We know her from Stay Away, Joe. What a beautiful lady and actress. The screen lighted up a bit, every time she appeared. Or was it me lighting up every time this happened?




.
I love that animation!


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Re: last movie you watched

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pmp wrote:
Tue Aug 09, 2022 7:58 pm
MikeFromHolland wrote:
Tue Aug 09, 2022 7:07 pm
.

Watched the longer Director’s Cut from The Bullfighter And The Lady (1951) by Budd Boetticher. Not to be confused with Elvis’ The Bullfighter Was A Lady ofcourse.





Though this version was 124 minutes, I found it quite fascinating. Still don’t get the charm of bull fighting, but it was very well filmed and edited. Some scenes taken from a low perspective, with the sky in the background, even reminded me of Triumph Des Willens by Leni Riefenstahl. Just to make the bullfighters look more heroic I suppose. Boetticher himself was a bull fighter, so this film might have a bit propaganda in it for this ‘sport’.

Nice it was to see Katy Jurado in this one. We know her from Stay Away, Joe. What a beautiful lady and actress. The screen lighted up a bit, every time she appeared. Or was it me lighting up every time this happened?




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I love that animation!

Thank you, he has several of them, this one is very nice indeed.

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Mike

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MikeFromHolland
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Re: last movie you watched

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Watched Putney Swope (1969) by Robert Downey (Sr.) and I have to say it’s still funny after all those years. I took me quite by surprise with that. The advertisement world hasn’t changed that much since than, so it seems. A very nice parody consisting more of a series of sketches than a coherent movie. Liked recognizing ‘Huggy Bear’ (from Starsky and Hutch) Antonio Fargas in this early role for him. A person you’d recognize from thousands I suppose.




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Mike

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MikeFromHolland
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Re: last movie you watched

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Watched the Spanish coming-of-age movie Krámpack (2000) by Cesc Gay. His second full feature. A really lovely and sometimes humorous film.

“ 17-year-old Dani invites his best friend and peer Nico to spend the summer in his parents' holiday home on the Spanish coast. Someone comes to cook for them and Dani has to take some extra lessons, but otherwise they have the empire on their own. The two boys, of course, make the most of this sudden freedom. They soon meet two girls in the nearby village. When they hang out with them more and more, it becomes clear that Nico's enthusiasm for the opposite sex is much greater than Dani's. It annoys Dani that his friend suddenly seems to be much more interested in his holiday love than he does. As his jealousy becomes increasingly painful and his feelings for Nico become more and more clear, the mutual sexual experiments of the two boys are also put in a different perspective.

Where does love begin and friendship ends? 'Krampack' is a light-hearted, humorous film about issues that are difficult to put into perspective, especially as a teenager.”





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Mike

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lay back,
take it easy
And try a smile...

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